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Lot Details

In 1983, Andy Warhol parlayed his lifelong interest in animals into a series of ten screenprints he called “Endangered Species.” The portfolio was produced at the behest of a pair of New York art dealers, Ronald and Frayda Feldman, who became interested in the idea of such a project in the wake of their numerous conversations with Warhol concerning ecological issues such as beach erosion. The brightly colored prints with their vigorous, erratic linear delineation—“animals in make-up,” as Warhol described them—depict animals such as a giant panda, a Grevy’s zebra, a bald eagle, and, here, an orangutan, all envisioned majestically and yet betraying a poignant resignation to their fate.

Here, Andy Warhol brings his distinctive Pop sensibility and style to bear on a resonant subject, suffusing the plate with vivid color and using his characteristic linear reiteration to imbue it with power and energy. Warhol contrasts this dynamism with the natural grace and humble pride of his animal subject.

Andy Warhol (1928-1987) is widely credited as one of the most significant artists of the 20th century. After studying design at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, Warhol moved to New York in 1949 to pursue a career as a commercial artist. Though successful, Warhol wanted to be an independent painter. In the early 1960s he began to create paintings based on advertising imagery. He established his own studio, The Factory, and developed his signature style, employing commercial silkscreening techniques to create identical, mass-produced images on canvas. With his multiple images of soup cans, soda bottles, dollar bills and celebrities, Warhol revealed the beauty within mass culture and redefined the art world.

Selected Public Collections:
Museum of Modern Art (New York, NY)
Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, NY)
Guggenheim Museum (New York, NY)
Whitney Museum of American Art (New York, NY)
Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA)
J. Paul Getty Museum (Los Angeles, CA)
Tate Gallery (London, UK)
National Galleries of Scotland (Edinburgh, UK)

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Catalogue Raisonné: Feldman II.299, Frayda Feldman and Jorg Schellmann
The seller has recorded the following condition for this lot:
Indentations / Ding
Area: Other area
Location: Lower right
Notes: There are 3 minor dings in the lower right black area of the print. Note: please contact specialist for images.
Degree: Minor

Definition Key
Area
Image The central image area, composition, or focal point; the area inside the margins/plate marks.
Margin Areas bordering the central image, outside the plate marks, or the perimeter area.
Edge The farthest edge of the object.
Verso The reverse/back of the object.



Degree
Minor An existing condition which generally does not involve risk of loss.
Moderate Noticeable damage, increasing in severity and/or size; should be monitored or corrected by a conservator.
Major Distinct, recognizable damage; the stability of the work is questionable and risk is a factor. Requires the attention of a conservator.
Extreme Advanced and severe damage; work is insecure and at great risk.

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  • Pickup Location: New Jersey, USA
  • Shipping Dimensions: 40 x 40 in. (101.6 x 101.6 cm.)

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