Dorothea Tanning Catalogue
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Dorothea Tanning
Chronology
1910
Born August 25th, Galesburg, Illinois. Second daughter of Andrew and Amanda Tanning.
 
1926
Graduation from Galesburg High School, Galesburg, Illinois.
 
1927
Employment at Galesburg Public Library, Galesburg, Illinois.
 
1928-1930
Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois.
 
1930-1933
Chicago, Illinois: Briefly attends art school. Operates marionettes at The Chicago World's Fair.
 
1934-1935
New Orleans, Louisiana for six months, where she has first one-person gallery show of drawings.
 
1936
New York, New York: Stunning impression made by Fantastic Art, Dada and Surrealism exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art.
 
1937
San Francisco, California: Draws covers and cartoons for a new local magazine, The Coast.
 
1938
New York, New York: Supports herself as a commercial artist.
 
1939
August: Paris, France.
September: escapes to Stockholm, Sweden as the war begins in Europe.
October: last boat back to New York.
 
1940-1941
More commercial art, chiefly fashion pages for Macy's, whose art director introduces her to the gallery owner Julien Levy.
 
1942
Julien Levy signs her on and introduces her to Max Ernst, whom she later marries.
 
1943
Summer in Sedona, Arizona.
 
1944
First one-person exhibition at the Julien Levy Gallery in New York. Summer at Great River, Long Island.
 
1945
Second Long Island Summer (Amagansett). Works on set and costume designs for George Balanchine's ballet The Night Shadow, presented by Les Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo in the old Metropolitan Opera House New York in March 1946.
 
1946
Returns to Arizona. October 24, marriage to Max Ernst in a double ceremony with Man Ray and Juliet Brouner, Beverly Hills.
 
1947
Helps to build a wooden house in Sedona, Arizona.
 
1948
Second solo exhibition at the Julien Levy Gallery, New York, New York.
 
1949
Paris, France: Works on her first album of lithographs, Les Sept Périls Spectraux (The Seven Spectral Perils).
 
1950
Summer in the south of France. Completes set and costume designs for The Witch, a new ballet choreographed by John Cranko in collaboration with The Sadler's Wells Ballet Company of London, and performed at Covent Garden, London, United Kingdom in August.
 
1951
Returns to Sedona, Arizona.
 
1952
Designs scenery and costumes for George Balanchine's ballet Bayou, performed in February by the New York City Ballet, with music by Virgil Thomson. Teaches a class in painting and drawing at summer session, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.
 
1953
First exhibition at Iolas Gallery, New York, New York. Returns to Paris, France.
 
1954
First one-person exhibition in Paris, at Galerie Furstenburg.
 
1955
Begins long association with Georges Visat, master etcher. Installs house and studio in Huismes, Indre et Loire, France.
 
1956-1957
Sedona, Arizona: Max Ernst loses American citizenship under the McCarran-Walter Act, and in October, Dorothea Tanning returns with Max Ernst to France.
 
1958-1963
France, U.S.A. and travels through Europe.
 
1963
An almost year-long bout with sciatica diminishes studio activity.
 
1964
Moves from Huismes to Seillans, a hilltop village in Provence, France.
 
1965-1966
Divides time between Seillans, Paris, and New York.
 
1967
Retrospective exhibition Dorothea Tanning in Knokke-le-Zoute, Belgium. Begins building a house in Seillans, France, a project that will occupy Dorothea Tanning for three years.
 
1969
Begins a series of cloth sculptures, inspired by a concert of new work by K. Stockhausen in Paris, France.
 
1970
Moves into completed new house in Seillans, France.
 
1972-1973
Paris and Seillans, France. Lithography with Pierre Chave, Vence, France.
 
1974
Retrospective exhibition at the Centre National d'Art Contemporain, Paris (now the Centre George Pompidou).
 
1975
Max Ernst suffers a stroke.
 
1976
Max Ernst dies, April 1.
 
1977
January: opening of the Centre Georges Pompidou, including Dorothea Tanning's sculpture installation Hôtel du Pavot, Chambre 202 (Poppy Hotel, Room 202) (1970-73).
 
1978
Begins the process of moving back to the United States.
 
1980-1981
Installs New York apartment and studio.
 
1982-1984
New York, with short visits to Paris and to Seillans, France.
 
1985
Santa Monica, California: work at The Litho Shop, the lithography presses of friend Sam Francis.
 
1986
Publishes a short memoir, Birthday, (Lapis Press, San Francisco).
 
1987-1990
Lithography in Santa Monica and in New York at the studios of Maurice Sanchez. Work at Christian Guerin etching studio.
 
1992
Retrospective of prints and illustrated books at the New York Public Library, New York, New York.
 
1993
Retrospective of paintings, drawings, and sculpture at Malmö Konsthall, Malmö, Sweden, which travels to Camden Arts Centre, London, United Kingdom.
 
1994
Establishes the a prize for mastery in the art of poetry, awarded annually by the American Academy of Poets.
 
1995
A monograph of paintings, drawings, sculpture and prints is published by George Braziller, New York, New York.
 
1997-1998
Paints a series of twelve large-scale canvases depicting imaginary flowers over six months. These images inspire twelve poems by contemporary poets, and they are published together in Another Language of Flowers (George Braziller, New York, New York).
 
1999
Retrospective exhibition of the past two decades' work at the Boston University Art Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts.
 
2000
Exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, celebrating its acquisition of the painting Birthday (1942).
 
2001
Publishes an expanded memoir, Between Lives, (W.W. Norton, New York, New York).
 
2004
Publishes an anthology of poetry, A Table of Content: Poems (Graywolf Press, St. Paul, Minnesota), and a novel, Chasm: A Weekend, (Overlook Press, New York, New York).
 
2005-2010
Continues to write and publish poetry in a number of literary reviews and magazines, such as The Yale Review, Poetry, The Paris Review, The Boston Review, The Southwest Review, Parnassus, and The New Yorker.
 
2011
Publishes second anthology of poetry, Coming to That (Graywolf Press, St. Paul, Minnesota).
 
Tanning 101: A Celebration of Dorothea Tanning's Life & Work in Poetry, Co-sponsored by the Academy of American Poets, Graywolf Press & the Poetry Society of America. Celeste Bartos Theater, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, New York. October 3, 2011, 7 p.m.
 
2012
Died on January 31 at the age of 101 in New York, New York.
 
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