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7/17/98


PAINTING THE PARRISH RED
The first big art event of the summer season out in the Hamptons is Barbara Kruger's You Belong Here, for which she will cover the entire exterior of the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, N.Y., with fireball-red slogans. Also on view: "Dreams for the Next Century: A View of the Collection," July 19-Sept. 6, 1998, organized by Klaus Kertess and Joseph Ruzicka and featuring works by 32 East End residents, including everyone from Elaine and Willem de Kooning to David Salle and Lynda Benglis.

"EVERY DAY" THEME FOR SYDNEY BIENNALE
The 11th Biennale of Sydney, Sept. 18-Nov. 8, 1998, takes the theme "Every Day" to indicate that today's artists have a "no-nonsense" attitude to "academic and self-referential post-modernism," according to Biennale artistic director Jonathan Watkins. The Biennale is to be unusually wide-ranging, extending from its regular venues, the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Museum of Contemporary Art, to sites throughout the city. For instance, Thai artist Navin Rawanchaikul will put a sound piece in Sydney taxis, German artist Gereon Lepper will put a sculpture in a lake in the Botanic Gardens and Brazilian artist José Resende will use a crane in Sydney's harbor to make an installation out of shipping containers. Other invited artists include Carl Andre, Chumpon Apisuk, Rasheed Araeen, Guy Bar-Amotz, Martin Creed, David Cunningham, Bernard Frize, On Kawara, Julian Opie, Jean Frederic Schnyder, Mitihiro Shimabuku and Beat Streuli.

NEW TITLE FOR ROSENBLUM
Guggenheim Museum adjunct curator Robert Rosenblum has been named the first Stephen and Nan Swid Curator of 20th-century Art at the museum, a new post endowed by the Swids.

ART STORE ART SHOW
The Art Store in New York has mounted its first art exhibition, with works slotted in among the shelves of paints and cases of brushes. Called "Materialism," July 16-Sept. 13, 1998, the exhibition is organized by Katherine Gass, late of the Aldrich Museum in Connecticut and the Curt Marcus Gallery. The dozen artists in the typically themed show include Karen Kimmel, Larry Krone and Allyson Strafella. Besides being in the show, the artists got a $100 gift certificate from the Art Store, located at 1-5 Bond Street in NoHo.

TURNER PRIZE FINALISTS
The short list for England's £20,000 Turner Prize for 1998 includes four London-based artists -- Tacita Dean, Cathy de Monchaux, Chris Ofili and Sam Taylor-Wood. Dean is known for 16mm films about disappearance at sea; de Monchaux specializes in wall-mounted sculptures that suggest vagina dentata; Ofili, who is of Nigerian descent, makes funky figurative paintings incorporating lumps of elephant dung; and Taylor-Wood makes films, video installations and panoramic photo-murals that have the look of fashion photographs. An exhibition of work by the finalists opens at the Tate Oct. 28, 1998-Jan. 10, 1999, and the winner is to be announced on Dec. 1.

DUANE HANSON TO WHITNEY
The Whitney Museum has slotted a retrospective of the late Photo-Realist sculptor Duane Hanson (1925-1996) into its 1998-99 schedule. "Duane Hanson: A Survey of His Work from the 30s to the 90s" goes on view Dec. 17, 1998-Mar. 21, 1999, featuring 24 full-scale sculptures plus nine little-seen early works. Among these are a four-foot-tall sculpture of Thomas Gainsborough's The Blue Boy, made when Hanson was 13. The show is organized by Laurence Pamer, curator at the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, where the show premiered Jan. 17-Aug. 2, 1998.

BOSTON MUSEUM WITHHOLDS GUATEMALAN ARTIFACTS
Boston's Museum of Fine Arts has rejected a Guatemalan government demand that it return a collection of artifacts, including burial urns and painted ceramics, that experts say were looted from Mayan grave sites, according to Reuters. "It's a very disagreeable decision," said Guatemalan Consul General Fabiola Fuentes Orellana, suggesting that a lawsuit might follow. Museum officials say the artifacts might have been exported in violation of Guatemalan law but their 1970s import didn't violate U.S. law.

BIGGER, BETTER GERALD PETERS GALLERY IN SANTA FE
Santa Fe big-foot Gerald Peters, who specializes in both historical Western and contemporary art, is about to unveil a new 32,000 square-foot facility. The Spanish Pueblo style building, designed by architect Steven Robinson, is said to be the largest freestanding art gallery in the country. Premiering on Aug. 15 is "Picasso On Paper: Selected Works From The Marina Picasso Collection," accompanied by a catalogue written by Picasso biographer John Richardson, as well as a group show including Western art plus works by David Bates, Ken Bunn, Deborah Butterfield, Claude Lalannes, Joan Miro, Henry Moore, George Rickey and James Searles. The new address is 1011 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe. Earlier this year Peters also opened a gallery in New York at 24 E. 78th Street.

CESAR EYED FOR FRAUD?
The 77-year-old Nouveaux Realiste sculptor César Baldaccini may be under investigation for fraud by a Lyon magistrate, according to a report in the ARTnewsletter. It seems that César billed a now-bankrupt Lyon-based real-estate company, SLYCI, some $600,000 for his ten-ton 1992 sculpture, The Man of the Future -- about $180,000 more than the original commission agreement. And it seems that the artist also gave, gratis, two works to SLYCI chief Henri Pochon. The magistrate seems to think the deal involves a kick-back but the artist says the higher price resulted from siting the sculpture in the center of Lyon.

MOMA GETS NINE PAINTINGS FROM PHILIP JOHNSON
Museum of Modern Art architect, curator, patron and trustee Philip Johnson has given nine paintings to the museum, including works by Willem de Kooning, Philip Guston, Jasper Johns, James Rosenquist and Andy Warhol. The works are on view in MoMA's third-floor galleries through the end of July.

KATY KLINE TO BOWDOIN
Katy Kline, director of the List Visual Arts Center at MIT since 1986, has been named director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in Brunswick, Me. Kline was chosen last month along with List Center Curator Helaine Posner as organizer of the United States exhibition at the next Venice Biennale.

TEN WARHOL PORTRAITS TO ISRAEL MUSEUM In honor of Israel's 50th anniversary, the Israel Museum has received Ten Portraits of Jews of the Twentieth Century by Andy Warhol as a gift from an international group of donors. The 1980 series includes paintings of Sarah Bernhardt, Louis Brandeis, Martin Buber, Albert Einstein, Sigmund Freud, George Gershwin, Franz Kafka, the Marx Brothers, Golda Meir and Gertrude Stein. The group of patrons from ten cities in five countries include Parisians Terry and Jean Gunzburg and Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder from New York.

PETRA BUNGERT PROJECTS IN BRUSSELS
Dealer Petra Bungert, much missed after she closed her New York gallery earlier this year, will open Petra Bungert Projects in Brussels on Oct. 13. The inaugural exhibition, "9 + 1," will present recent works by Michael Brennan, John Beech, Janine Cohen, Katarina Grosse, Simon Ungers, Beat Zoderers and more.

FRANKLIN FURNACE GRANTS
Franklin Furnace in New York has announced the 10 winners of $2,000 grants to produce performance works. They are Derek Bernstein and Amy Sue Rosen, Justin Chin, Coco Fusco and Nao Bustamente, Galinsky, Devora Neumark, Default Propaganda, Annie Cynthia Pachinkara, Hank Smith, Deborah Swisher and the team of Kriota Wilberg, Todd Alcott and R. Sikoryak.

MAYA LIN AT NYU'S GREY
Landscape architect Maya Lin gets her first solo museum exhibition in New York at New York University's Grey Art Gallery, Sept. 1-Oct. 31, 1998. "Maya Lin: Topologies" is to feature 15 projects, including Rock Field (1977), a blown-glass installation mimicking a river bed, and Landscape (1997-98), a 16 x 18 ft. platform of plywood strips representing the earth's topography.

BRITAIN LOOSES MARBLES . . . TO TURKEY
The British Museum resolutely refuses to return the Elgin Marbles to Greece, but Britain has agreed to return the Castor Marbles to Turkey. In 1894 a Dutch ship carrying the sculptures to a museum in Holland collided with a German vessel and sank to the bottom of the English Channel. Three years ago, seven of the 14 marbles were recovered by British divers. Including a figure of Venus and a bust of Emperor Marcus Aurelius, the sculptures were on display at Folkestone Museum in Kent until Turkey claimed ownership.

TUTTLE WINS AACHEN ART PRIZE
Richard Tuttle is the winner of this year's $11,000 Aachen Art Prize from the Ludwig Forum fur Internationale Kunst in Aachen, Germany. An exhibition of his recent work, "The Conjunction of Color" goes on view there Dec. 11, 1998-Feb. 14, 1999.

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