Tyler Rollins Fine Art

MANUEL OCAMPO: AN ARCANE RECIPE INVOLVING INGREDIENTS CANNIBALIZED FROM THE

MANUEL OCAMPO: AN ARCANE RECIPE INVOLVING INGREDIENTS CANNIBALIZED FROM THE

the holocaustic spackle in the murals of the quixotic inseminators ii, manuel ocampo by manuel ocampo

Manuel Ocampo

The Holocaustic Spackle in the Murals of the Quixotic Inseminators II, Manuel Ocampo, 2010

Thursday, September 16, 2010Saturday, October 30, 2010


New York, NY USA

Thursday, September 16, 6 – 8:30 pm

Tyler Rollins Fine Art is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by Manuel Ocampo, marking his first New York solo show in a number of years. Entitled An Arcane Recipe Involving Ingredients Cannibalized from the Reliquaries of Some Profane Illumination, the exhibition features a group of predominantly monochrome oil paintings that blend traditional Christian iconography with mysterious, emotionally charged motifs, creating cryptic allegories that are at once ironic and disturbing.

The most internationally active contemporary artist from the Philippines, Ocampo has been an important voice on the Filipino and global scene since his first solo show in Los Angeles in 1988. He is known for fearlessly attacking the taboos and cherished icons of society and of the art world itself. Widely respected in Europe, Asia, and the US, he has been included in numerous museum exhibitions and biennials around the world, including the Venice Biennale (2001) and Documenta (1992) as well as the biennials of Seville (2004), Berlin (2001), Lyon (2000) and Gwangju (1997).

Describing the exhibition, Ocampo writes: “The theme that comes up again and again is of figures that connect to a sort of mythinduced stereotype, rendered iconic but bludgeoned into a farcical conceptual iconoclasm made absurd by its exaggerated impotence as a carrier of meaning or the esthetics of politics. The paintings are a comment on desire, as painting itself is an object accustomed to this wish of being desirous, yet in the series they have a knack of providing some difficulty to the viewer as the conventions of painting are dismantled to the point of ridicule.”