Stoppenbach & Delestre

Pierre Eugène Montézin

(French, 1874–1946)

maison près de la mare by pierre eugène montézin

Pierre Eugène Montézin

Maison près de la mare

Price on Request

Biography

Timeline

Born in Paris in 1874, the son of a lace draftsman, he was introduced into the arts at a very young age, entering a decorative atelier where he learned the art of executing decorative murals. Soon he became influenced by the theories and techniques of the first Impressionists, prompting him to take up a career as an independent painter-artist. Already in 1893, only 19 years of age, he tried his first entry in the Salon, but was refused; it would take him ten more years before being accepted. In 1903 Montezin also befriended Quost, who made him focus on his drawing skills and bestowed him with a real taste for the fine art of painting. From then on he received almost constant recognition for his work, being awarded medals in 1907 and 1910, before being enlisted in the war in 1914, serving for its duration.
Immediately after the war he took up painting again and resumed exhibiting at the Salon des Artistes Français. Montezin lived for a year in Dreux and in Moret, where he painted the rural landscapes, often inhabited with animals, which would inspire him for the rest of his life. Returning almost every year to these environments, he developed his personal post-impressionist style, which would bring him much success. In 1920 he was awarded the Rosa Bonheur Prize, a special award for animal painting named after the famous female animal painter of the 19th century; in 1923 he was awarded the Chevalier of the Légion d’honneur.