Katinka Pilscheur | Tony Camargo
25º 25’ S 49º 15’ W / 52º 30’ N 5º 56’ W

Katinka Pilscheur | Tony Camargo
25º 25’ S 49º 15’ W / 52º 30’ N 5º 56’ W

installation view by katinka pilscheur

Katinka Pilscheur

Installation View, 2013

Price on Request

installation view by katinka pilscheur

Katinka Pilscheur

Installation View, 2013

Price on Request

gallery view by katinka pilscheur

Katinka Pilscheur

Gallery View, 2013

Price on Request

installation view by katinka pilscheur

Katinka Pilscheur

Installation View, 2013

Price on Request

installation view (<i>p52</i>) by tony camargo

Tony Camargo

Installation View (P52), 2013

Price on Request

installation view by tony camargo

Tony Camargo

Installation View, 2013

Price on Request

installation view by tony camargo

Tony Camargo

Installation View, 2013

Price on Request

Thursday, April 18, 2013


Curitiba, Brazil

Reasserting its interest in establishing contacts, providing confrontation, catalyzing friction, SIM Galeria, less a name than a declaration of principles, invites two artists from very different backgrounds and origins - a German and a Brazilian - to constitute a single exhibition. Notwithstanding the sensitive differences between their research, Katinka Pilscheur and Tony Camargo have in common the same maladjustment in relation to the definition of what is art. In both works the difficulty of grasping concepts, the taste for unrest, the instability and the experimentation are a common denominator.

The chance meeting begins on the outside, with the painting/barcode performed by Katinka Pilscheur in the approximate color hue to the one a famous manufacturer of synthetic enamels, Colorama, names Garota Verão. As everyone knows, barcodes represent the product it refers to, or at least its price. The artist, however, reifies the metaphor imprinting it on the facade, inviting the passerby to come and decipher the hidden meaning of this number printed on a bright orange red background, blatantly alive. It’s a vain illusion. Inside the gallery, in the area set apart for her work, the artist creates an ultra-complex space: a set of thin and thick silvery vertical bars of variable density, propped from the ceiling to the floor. These groupings come to entrench the visitors, turning the visit to the gallery into a slow drift, taking care not to bump into the vertical bars that bar their steps, running up and down their reflective skins, seeing themselves and the other bars multiply. The artist may or may not insert colored material between the roof and the ends of some of these bars, creating objects similar to the two paintings, one green and one gray, she will put up on the wall of the larger room, where there will remain only three or four or five bars, arranged asymmetrically, challenging the spectators with their presence, as well as the paintings, the stability of the environment provided by the architecture.

The room reserved for Tony Camargo is smaller but enough for him to fill it with colors and actions embedded in his new works belonging to the series Planopinturas, Fotomódulos e Videomódulos. More than vivid, the colors used, applied through proper industrial painting instruments, amplify because of the contrasts obtained: each screen creates a curious eclipse, similar to a sun that, despite its powerful light, keeps from irradiating the environment.

The exchange between photography and painting proposed by the “fotomódulos” enunciates a tension that never resolves itself, since a language gushes over the other at the same time it retracts itself. Painting and world, eminently artificial colors, available in palettes offered by paint companies, are found in the myriad of objects that live around us, including posters, signs, billboards, labels, clothes and fabrics, even in the intensity of the flowers that bloom with unusual force in this tropical country. The arrival of the “videomódulos” takes the problem to another statute, since the artist's shaky pose, always muffled as if to ensure that his face does not steal the show, is jeopardized by the clashes with the color plane that shares the video screen. As if attracted by the colors of objects and accoutrements of the scene that runs on the side, the colored flat space races against it, as a retractable plane with which it crashes intermittently, and that aims to unbalance it.

Painting, sculpture and installation; painting, photography, film and performance, the data that composes the poetry of Katinka Pilscheur and Tony Camargo reinforces the idea, face to face in this encounter, of the importance of working under the sign of rupture.

Agnaldo Farias