Senior & Shopmaker Gallery

Sol Lewitt and Robert Mangold: Drawing Into Print

Sol Lewitt and Robert Mangold: Drawing Into Print

half column b by robert mangold

Robert Mangold

Half Column B, 2005

Price on Request

tall column b by robert mangold

Robert Mangold

Tall Column B, 2005

Price on Request

tall column a by robert mangold

Robert Mangold

Tall Column A, 2005

Price on Request

Thursday, April 7, 2005Saturday, June 11, 2005


Sol Lewitt and Robert Mangold: Drawing Into Print
April 7 – June 11, 2005

Senior & Shopmaker Gallery is pleased to present Sol Lewitt and Robert Mangold: Drawing Into Print, an examination of the relationship between drawing and printmaking by two venerable figures of American abstraction. The exhibition includes over forty prints, related drawings, and working sketches by two artists for whom printmaking has played a central role. Since both artists are known to work in series and employ systematic methodologies to image-making, this exhibition traces the structure of the cube and other geometric figures as they appear in Lewitt’s prints and drawings, and the ‘column’ form that has preoccupied Mangold since 2002. The exhibition features Lewitt’s Isometric Cube with Lines in Four Directions and Four Colors (1983) and Cubes on Cubes in Color (2003) as well as four new color aquatints by Mangold, two of which, measuring 86 inches tall, approach the scale of his paintings.

For Lewitt, the activity of printmaking is similar to other aspects of the artist’s work. Silkscreens and woodcuts, like Lewitt’s well-known wall drawings, are executed by assistants, whereas etchings, like his drawings and gouaches on paper, are drawn by the artist himself. The ease with which the elements in a print can be altered – by changing colors, lines, or adding layers – has allowed Lewitt to expand his serial imagery beyond the scope of drawing or sculpture. His prints of the last fifteen years alternate between the flat, precise delineations afforded by linocut and the sumptuous surfaces and layers of saturated color of his aquatints.

For Mangold, printmaking and drawing are ways of investigating process and visual ideas. His earliest prints from the late 1960s possess a significant parallel to his paintings, but by the 1980s, Mangold began to use drawing and printmaking as a lead into the paintings. “I do a lot of things in prints today which are ahead of the paintings, taking positions, trying them out in prints and drawings.” Mangold’s art has always been about the relationship of line to color, which is also the essence of printmaking. In his new column aquatints, elegantly elongated rectangles of orange, blue, or chartreuse contain sinuous interweaving lines that touch their borders at geometrically determined locations. They appear to allude to the twisted architectural columns of Baroque churches or organic forms found in nature.

This exhibition will be on view at the gallery through Saturday, June 11, and coincides with the presentation of two site-specific sculptures by Sol Lewitt on view at Madison Square Park and organized by the Madison Square Park Conservancy.

Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday 10-6; Saturday 11-6. For further press information, please contact Chris Murtha at 212.213.6767.