Schneider Gallery

Christian Weber: EXPLOSIONS/S. Gayle Stevens: Nocturnes

Christian Weber: EXPLOSIONS/S. Gayle Stevens: Nocturnes

untitled no. 182013 by christian weber

Christian Weber

Untitled No. 182013

Price on Request

untitled no. 102013 by christian weber

Christian Weber

Untitled No. 102013

Price on Request

untitled no. 092013 by christian weber

Christian Weber

Untitled No. 092013

Price on Request

untitled no. 042013 by christian weber

Christian Weber

Untitled No. 042013

Price on Request

untitled no. 442013 by christian weber

Christian Weber

Untitled No. 442013

Price on Request

untitled no. 222013 by christian weber

Christian Weber

Untitled No. 222013

Price on Request

Friday, March 7, 2014Saturday, April 26, 2014

230 W. Superior
Chicago, IL USA

Schneider Gallery is pleased to present recent works by Christian Weber and S. Gayle Stevens. These artists have embraced the transformative power of photography through process and subject matter. Weber, with his high speed photographs of fireballs, employs the latest in photographic technology to capture movement too fast for the human eye. Conversely, S. Gayle Stevens creates her imagery through a mixture of chemicals onto a photographic plate; the final pieces depict the world around her but are distorted by time and process.

Christian Weber’s EXPLOSIONS are created through the construction of “various pyrotechnic tableaus,” arrangements of explosives that are ignited and photographed repeatedly throughout their short lifespans. Like Harold Edgerton’s atomic bomb photographs, the intensely powerful energy is transformed through Weber’s photographic presentation. The formal qualities of each image have individualized associations; some appear before the viewer as dim nebulous stars, while others have curling shapes and structures that could be part of our anatomical makeup.

S. Gayle Stevens has been working with 19th century processes for over two decades. In her latest work, Nocturnes, she abstracts the landscape along with coast dwelling creatures through painting chemicals onto metal plates. Like Weber, her work also speaks the language of time. However, with Stevens, time is elongated -- drawn out -- and collapsed onto a single plate. She operates somewhere between photographer and painter as brushstroke patterns emerge in tandem with her photographic images, creating an atmospheric, day-for-night depiction of the ocean and the local inhabitants.

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