Ruth Bachofner Gallery

KAORU MANSOUR: New Work

KAORU MANSOUR: New Work

zakuro #105 by kaoru mansour

Kaoru Mansour

Zakuro #105, 2010

Price on Request

sampo #110 by kaoru mansour

Kaoru Mansour

Sampo #110, 2010

Price on Request

iro #529 by kaoru mansour

Kaoru Mansour

Iro #529, 2010

Price on Request

iro (mi) #290 by kaoru mansour

Kaoru Mansour

Iro (Mi) #290, 2010

Price on Request

Saturday, October 23, 2010Saturday, November 20, 2010


Santa Monica, CA USA

Ruth Bachofner Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Kaoru Mansour. There will be a reception for the artist Saturday, October 23, 5-7 PM

Kaoru Mansour is a native of Japan, where she grew up in a small mountainous village. Her early memories of the tremendous varieties of seasonal plants in the forest were forgotten when she initially moved to the city later in life. As she began her formal training at Otis Parsons Art Institute in Los Angeles, the impact of her previous natural surroundings emerged.

Mansour’s work connects imagery and forms from the natural world with abstraction, to express various modes of organic impressions. The works bridge her roots in Japanese aesthetic with her western academic training, both technically and conceptually. In her work, the artist uses images of botanic material gleaned from her urban surroundings in Los Angeles. The plants function in her work both as figurative and formal elements, as images of gathered plant life are transferred onto surfaces, which she enriches with intricate mark-making. Her delicate markings swirl around and attach to the branches, creating new, otherworldly graphic plant forms.

For this exhibition, Mansour combines painting with collage work. In these works, markings transition from organic to linear and more specific, with numbers, graphic lines, bold circles and typography. These more dense compositions evoke a searching quality that seem to map the wayward path of the subconscious. Images are gathered to form singular compositions. The non specific compositions point to a dream-like state where memories and impressions converge as disparate symbols physically layered on top of one another.