Peter Blake Gallery

JAN MAARTEN VOSKUIL & STEPHANIE BACHIERO

JAN MAARTEN VOSKUIL & STEPHANIE BACHIERO

installation view by stephanie bachiero

Stephanie Bachiero

Installation View, 2014

Price on Request

installation view by stephanie bachiero

Stephanie Bachiero

Installation View, 2014

Price on Request

installation view by stephanie bachiero

Stephanie Bachiero

Installation View, 2014

Price on Request

installation view by stephanie bachiero

Stephanie Bachiero

Installation View

Price on Request

installation view by stephanie bachiero

Stephanie Bachiero

Installation View

Price on Request

installation view by jan maarten voskuil

Jan Maarten Voskuil

Installation View, 2014

Price on Request

installation view by jan maarten voskuil

Jan Maarten Voskuil

Installation View, 2014

Price on Request

installation view by jan maarten voskuil

Jan Maarten Voskuil

Installation View, 2014

Price on Request

installation view by jan maarten voskuil

Jan Maarten Voskuil

Installation View, 2014

Price on Request

Thursday, June 5, 2014Saturday, July 26, 2014

435 Ocean Avenue
Laguna Beach, CA 92651 USA

Improved Pointlessness
By, Roberta Carasso
ArtScene, June 2014

Dutch artist Jan Maarten Voskuil pushes forward abstract configurations of form, space, and structure; rigorously each plays on the other in counterpoint. With a fine-tuned analytic mind, a fresh vision, exquisite craftsmanship, and inventiveness, Voskuil’s illusionistic yet concrete techniques yield what can be called hybrid sculptural paintings or painterly sculpture. The artist and viewer move into fresh perceptual territories as two and three dimensions, painting and sculpture, meld roles making visual dynamism erupt.

Unlike Voskuil’s previous series, much of the work hangs on the wall,. The front gallery is alive with massive shaped roundish dots of opposing forces. Each is a different central color, broken into varying planes that jut out, curve in, shift, or recede in unexpected configurations. Seen together, the pieces seem to dialogue with each other in their own artistic language. Initially their similarities appear repetitious. However, upon closer inspection, each is individually crafted with no two alike. Voskuil’s mathematical and artistic skills endow each with varying points of reference (Improved Pointlessness), as he transitions points of the many plane seamlessly. The artist achieves this conceptual approach through intricate constructions, hand-made stretcher bars that bend and curve pliably in different directions and meet at critical, but individual, points in each structure. From the side, the wooden bones and acrylic linen skin are visible, revealing the artistic anatomy that makes each frontal illusion real.”Squeezing Twice” and “Untitled” show another side, Voskuil’s serious but playful nature. The first was created in Holland to precisely fit a section of Blake’s gallery. Its two rectangular forms seem to freely grip the three-sided alcove as if suspended in space. The second is a rectangular white with black board erect in a corner. Its trompe l'oeil effect changes spatially before our eyes, as the front view becomes the side.