Pangolin London

Lynn Chadwick: The Couple

Lynn Chadwick: The Couple

Wednesday, January 12, 2011Saturday, February 26, 2011


London, United Kingdom

Lynn Chadwick: The Couple is the largest exhibition of its kind to concentrate on one of the most prevalent themes of Chadwick’s artistic career: ‘The Couple’. Exploring the most intimate of human unions the exhibition will include works spanning over 40 years, from seminal early pieces such as Teddy Boy and Girl and Dancers through to his instantly recognisable seated couples of the late 80s and early 90s.

Lynn Chadwick is one of the most eminent British sculptors of the 20th century, and an important addition to any modern art collection. Chadwick first came to prominence in 1952 when he was included in the British Council’s New Aspects of British Sculpture exhibition for the XXVI Venice Biennale alongside Kenneth Armitage, Reg Butler, Henry Moore and Eduardo Paolozzi. The following year he was one of twelve semi-finalists for the Unknown Political Prisoner International Sculpture Competition and at the 1956 Venice Biennale he won the International Sculpture Prize, beating Giacometti.

Pangolin London has a particularly unique relationship with Lynn Chadwick which dates back to 1983 when owners Rungwe Kingdon and Claude Koenig were appointed his founders and assistants. They went on to set up their own foundry, Pangolin Editions, which is now the largest in Europe and which Pangolin London are directly affiliated to. Pangolin London feel extremely privileged to have such direct insight into the mind of the artist, and the intricate process of casting Lynn Chadwick’s sculptures into bronze.

Unlike Hepworth and Moore with their dedication to ‘truth to materials’, Chadwick reversed the process and used construction. He was one of the first sculptors to explore welding, making up linear armature or a skeleton onto which he applied a skin, building up the surface to a solid form. What stands Chadwick’s sculpture apart from the rest is their sculptural ‘attitude’ which he skillfully used to express a particular stance and the relationship of one mass to another whilst also concentrating on precision of line, crispness of texture and subtlety of colour.

Speaking of Lynn Chadwick’s couples Rungwe Kingdon notes their diversity:
‘Some are tender, even romantic, others frenetic and disjointed but they all contain a pent-up energy. Isolated in their own space they command our attention: object fusing with image, image redolent with association, King and Queen, Man and Woman, lovers, dancers. The winged figures are part bird, part plane, energetic, mechanical birdmen, half Leonardo construction and half Chadwick angel.’

This exhibition could not come at a more exciting time for Modern British Sculpture, with a huge increase in popularity throughout the art world and a significant rise in market performance. The Royal Academy’s forthcoming show Modern British Sculpture (22 January – 7 April 2011) will only highlight the current climate. With auction houses pushing sculpture as their premium lots, it is certainly a good time to be investing in sculpture. Lynn Chadwick: The Couple will provide an exciting opportunity to purchase an important example of his work.