Mitchell-Innes & Nash

Justine Kurland: Sincere Auto Care

Justine Kurland: Sincere Auto Care

what casper might look like if he grew up to be a junkie in tacoma by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

What Casper Might Look Like if He Grew Up to be a Junkie in Tacoma, 2013

Price on Request

sparrow road kill by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

Sparrow Road Kill, 2013

Price on Request

rebuilt engine by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

Rebuilt Engine, 2013

Price on Request

spray fire custom by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

Spray Fire Custom, 2013

Price on Request

wheels and rims by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

Wheels and Rims, 2011

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death seat by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

Death Seat, 2012

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traffic enforcement division by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

Traffic Enforcement Division, 2013

Price on Request

tigers on cesar chavez by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

Tigers on Cesar Chavez, 2011

Price on Request

280 coup by justine kurland

Justine Kurland

280 Coup, 2012

Price on Request

Thursday, September 4, 2014Saturday, October 11, 2014

534 W. 26th Street
New York, NY 10001 USA

NEW YORK, July 15, 2014 – Mitchell-Innes & Nash is pleased to announce Justine Kurland: Sincere Auto Care, on view at our Chelsea location from September 4 – October 11, 2014. This will be the gallery's third solo exhibition of Kurland's work, and will coincide with a group exhibition curated by Justine Kurland at our 1018 Madison Avenue location titled Days Inn.

Kurland has become known for her utopian photographs of American landscapes and the fringe communities, both real and imagined, that inhabit them. For her last exhibition at the gallery, The Train is Bound for Glory (2009), Kurland spent two years driving through the expansive American West documenting trains in open vistas and the subculture of train-hoppers and drifters around them. The 2007 series Of Woman Born, also photographed on the road, features unclothed mothers and their children whom Kurland met and befriended along the way.

For her most recent series, Kurland returns to a purely documentary style in the tradition of Walker Evans. Cars, the culture of the mechanic and the open road are Kurland's subjects, drawing on her twelve years of experience with life on the road. The photographs in Sincere Auto Care balance two competing narratives: the car as an aspirational symbol of freedom, sex, the American Dream, and the bleaker daily life behind the scenes.

With this body of work, Kurland presents a reality where utopia and dystopia are not polar opposites, but rather fold together in an uneasy coexistence. The formal elegance of the photos and Kurland's eye for teasing romance and beauty out of her subjects gives rise to a sense of detached optimism, or as Kurland herself describes, a place "where beauty is found not because the world is beautiful but because it is beautifully described".