Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby

installation view by sterling ruby

Sterling Ruby

installation view

installation view by sterling ruby

Sterling Ruby

installation view

installation view by sterling ruby

Sterling Ruby

installation view

Thursday, April 11, 2013Friday, May 10, 2013


Seoul, South Korea

Kukje Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition of Sterling Ruby opening on April 11, 2013. This will be the artist’s first exhibition in Korea.

The artist will present an installation of new works in galleries K1 and K3 including large color field paintings, ceramic and bronze basin sculptures. This stripped down exhibition highlights the artist’s masterful manipulations of his materials and surfaces—from the atmospheric layering of spray paint on canvas, to the dripping excessive glazes on his large-scale ceramic basins, to pieces cast in bronze, to his fabric collages, with their rags and fabric scraps, edged with glue and grime and formally arranged on a ground of bleached denim.

This installation of works feels tomblike and austere. Large scale cardboard and fabric collages hang on the walls. Basin sculptures made in ceramic and bronze are installed in the center of the galleries as if serving as archaic sites of sacrifices or offerings. A set of pastel hued paintings stand in striking contrast to the dark and monochromatic shades of the bronze sculptures.

The cardboard collages, collectively titled EXHM, provide entry to the content and tensions buried within these new works. The artist makes collages with the large cardboard pieces that are used to protect the floor of the studio during the making of his large urethane sculptures. These cardboard pieces covered in urethane, dirt, tape and footprints are reinvented as formal compositions. They contain clues to a latent trauma with their incorporation of images of burial grounds, correctional facilities, prescription packages and other objects found within the studio.

In his recent ceramic series, titled Basin Theology, Ruby fills low basins with fractured pieces of broken and discarded ceramic works. This reuse of broken remnants becomes symbolic of an unburdening, a redemption of past mistakes and failures. The ceramic fragments, often resembling animal remains or pottery shards, are melded together through a process of repeated glazing and firing.