Todd Murphy: Narrow Road to the Far South, Vivian Maier: Photographs, Chip Simone: Chroma

Todd Murphy: Narrow Road to the Far South, Vivian Maier: Photographs, Chip Simone: Chroma

self-portrait, march 27, 1968 by vivian maier

Vivian Maier

Self-Portrait, March 27, 1968, 2011

Price on Request

narrow road to the far south #14 by todd murphy

Todd Murphy

Narrow Road to the Far South #14, 2011

Price on Request

blue truck bed, sioux falls, south dakota, 2001 by chip simone

Chip Simone

Blue Truck Bed, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 2001

Price on Request

Friday, January 27, 2012Saturday, April 7, 2012


Atlanta, GA USA

Jackson Fine Art is pleased to present three exhibitions by photographers with profoundinterest in the world around them. From Todd Murphy’s monumental images of Antarctic icebergs to Chip Simone’s vibrant scenes of contemporary cityscapes to Vivian Maier’s incredible candid shots of street life, one can truly see the beauty and peculiarity in life. The curiosity of our extraordinary world, be it natural or man-made, is evident in these photographers remarkable images.

After returning from Antarctica, Todd Murphy revealed his much-anticipated new series, The Narrow Road to the Far South. Massive icebergs take center stage in these hauntingly beautiful photographs. The title of the series is a reference to the acclaimed Japanese poet Matsuo Bushô’s travel journal, The Narrow Road to the Deep North, from the late 17th century. Murphy, like Bushô with haiku, depicts the natural world in a simplistic yet powerful manner. The strength and grandeur of water captivates the viewer in these sublime black and white images.

Todd Murphy (b. 1962) was born in Chicago and moved to Georgia as a child. After studying art at the University of Georgia, he began his acclaimed artistic career in Atlanta. He is best known for his breath-taking large format paintings and sculptural installations. In addition to being a visiting artist and lecturer at several universities, he has curated major corporate and institutional projects. His work is included in many private collections including Jon Bon Jovi, Uma Thurman, and the Sir Elton John collection as well as several museum collections such as The High Museum of Art, The New Orleans Museum, and The Tampa Museum of Art to name a few. Murphy currently resides with his family in Brooklyn, New York.

For three decades, Chip Simone was dedicated to black-and-white street photography. In January of 2000, he took a road trip with two cameras: one for black and white and one for color. It was after this trip that he abandoned black and white for the vividness of color photography. Exploring Worcester, Massachusetts (his hometown) and Atlanta, Georgia (his home since 1972), Simone brings the world around him to life with his surprising and delightful use of color. Simone writes, “Over the past decade, color photography has become a more malleable and nuanced artistic language capable of sublime poetics and deeply personal expression. With it I have tried to make images that draw strength from the visceral power of color and resonate with its emotional gravity.”

Chip Simone (b. 1945) was educated at the Rhode Island School of Design, where he studied with renowned photographer Harry Callahan. In 1980, his work was exhibited at the Winter Olympic Games in Lake Placid. In 1982, he received a Photographer’s Fellowship from The National Endowment for the Arts. His photographs are included in major collections, including The Museum of Modern Art, The High Museum of Art, The Houston Museum of Fine Art, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, and the Sir Elton John Photography Collection. Sixty-four of his color photographs were recently displayed at The High Museum of Art in a major retrospective entitled The Resonant Image, and his book—Chroma—was published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Vivian Maier’s photographs are… “…brilliant” –Town & Country “…arresting” –Vanity Fair “one of America’s more insightful street photographers…”—New York Times blog “Striking scenes…captivating cityscapes”—Associated Press

Vivian Maier (1926-2009) has been compared to the greatest street photographers in the canon of art history: Lisette Model, Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus, Walker Evans, and André Kertész, and the discovery of her photographs is an incredibly important addition to the history of street photography. Remarkably, during her lifetime, she kept her photographs private and showed them to no one.

She was born in New York to a French mother, who moved Maier to France as a child. In the 1950s, she began working as a professional nanny for families in Chicago. It was during this time that Maier became a voracious street photographer of Chicago, New York, and while travelling abroad. Although she was an extremely private person, the children and families she worked for remember her as being an almost Mary Poppinslike character, taking the children on adventures dressed in a floppy hat, oversized coat, and always with a camera around her neck. Through her photographs, one sees Maier’s exceptional timing, thoughtfulness, and humor.

In 2007, the contents of her storage locker, including some 100,000 negatives, were auctioned in Chicago due to delinquent payments. After the discovery of her extensive collection, champions of Maier’s photographs have worked tirelessly to give these images their proper recognition with exhibitions throughout Europe and the United States. The best of her heretofore-unseen images were recently published in Vivian Maier: Street Photographer, which will also be available at the gallery for purchase.

For more information, please contact Courtney Lee at Jackson Fine Art via email courtney@jacksonfineart.com or phone (404.233.3739).