GEMINI G.E.L. AT JONI MOISANT WEYL

Frank Gehry at Gemini: New Sculpture & Prints, with a Survey of Past Projects

Frank Gehry at Gemini: New Sculpture & Prints, with a Survey of Past Projects

installation view

Installation View

installation view

Installation View

installation view

Installation View

installation view

Installation View

installation view

Installation View

installation view

Installation View

installation view

Installation View

Tuesday, February 5, 2013Saturday, April 13, 2013


New York, NY USA

February is the one-year anniversary of Gemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl’s relocation to 535 West 24th Street, and we are marking the moment by celebrating architecture. The extraordinarily innovative, award-winning architect Frank Gehry has been making prints and sculptures with the Los Angeles-based artists’ workshop Gemini G.E.L. for over a decade. This presentation of his newest Gemini projects, as well as a survey of previous works, will grace our Stamberg Aferiat Architecture-designed gallery beginning on February 5 and continuing through April 13.

A newly editioned sculpture by Gehry, made of resin and placed on a wooden base designed by Gehry, will be introduced in this exhibition. Titled Memory of Sophie Calle’s Flower, it refers to a telephone booth collaboratively created by Gehry and Calle which was placed upon a bridge spanning the Seine river in Paris. The lithographic prints on view, including his newest Puzzled images, depict various architectural projects – some recently completed as well as some unrealized. Gehry begins each architectural project with a sketch – what he calls the “tentativeness, the messiness.” From these abstract drawings, Gehry goes about refining his ideas until they finally are realized in tangible, three-dimensional form. While the prints are not actual preparatory sketches, they reflect the creative genius behind some of Gehry’s most iconic buildings. Gehry has achieved world-wide acclaim for his distinctive design sensibility; among the most innovative architects in history, Gehry’s buildings seem to defy gravity and the natural laws of physics. One of Gehry’s earliest buildings includes an addition to the Gemini G.E.L. workshop which was completed in 1979.

In a first for Gemini G.E.L. at Joni Moisant Weyl, the gallery’s architects, Peter Stamberg and Paul Aferiat, were asked to create the exhibition design. Gehry agreed to the enlarging of his Marques de Riscal Winery image; a vinyl graphic was produced and rubbed onto one of the gallery’s walls. The enlarged graphic, along with the addition of color to what are normally white walls, transforms the gallery while brilliantly focusing the viewer’s attention on Gehry’s sculpture and prints.

Now in its 29th year, GEMINI G.E.L. AT JONI MOISANT WEYL was established in 1984 as the New York gallery exhibiting and representing the publications of the Gemini G.E.L. workshop. The gallery shows new editions as they are published, and has mounted many historical survey exhibitions. Gemini G.E.L. began in 1966 as an artists' workshop and publisher of hand-printed limited edition lithographs. Responding to the expanding interests of its artists, work began on its first sculpture edition in 1968 with Claes Oldenburg's Profile Airflow, and in 1970, Frank Stella's Pastel Stack was started as the first project in the screenprinting workshop. The etching workshop opened in 1977 and woodcuts were being made by 1980. Since 1966, Gemini has collaborated on major bodies of work with many of Contemporary Art’s most accomplished painters and sculptors. At Gemini, the artists do all of the drawing or carving themselves directly onto the printing element, be it limestone, copper plate, woodblock or otherwise. The artist stays at the workshop until a "RTP" (Right to Print) is achieved. Edition printing may take several months and each proof in the edition must closely match the approved RTP. Once the printing is completed, the artist returns to the workshop to examine and sign the edition. Each print is signed and numbered by the artist as well as embossed with the Gemini "chop".

In 1981, the National Gallery in Washington, D.C. honored Gemini with the establishment of a permanent archive. The archive functions as a study center for collectors and scholars, and contains a complete history of the workshop. Included in the archive is one proof from each of the over 2100 editions produced, as well as ancillary materials such as shop records and printing elements. Three major touring exhibitions with works from the archive have been organized and exhibited by the National Gallery. An online catalogue raisonné, on view at the National Gallery's website (www.nga.gov/gemini), provides detailed information on the history of the workshop and all of the artworks in the Gemini archive.

Longtime clients and friends of the gallery, Stamberg Aferiat Architecture was commissioned to create the gallery’s 3,000 square-foot space located in the heart of Chelsea, which opened in February 2012. Known for their innovative and bold use of color as well as for (quoting their mission statement) “finding simple solutions to difficult architectural problems,” Peter Stamberg and Paul Aferiat were assisted in the gallery’s design by Keith Tsang and Josh Homer, and in the design of the Gehry exhibition by Jose Vilanova and Keith Tsang.

For additional information, contact: Jae-Min Hwang ▪▪ 212-249-3324 gemini@joniweyl.com