Galerie Barbara Weiss

Susanne Paesler 'Karo und Mondschein'

Susanne Paesler 'Karo und Mondschein'

o.t. by susanne paesler

Susanne Paesler

o.T., 2002

o.t. by susanne paesler

Susanne Paesler

o.T., 1993

o.t. by susanne paesler

Susanne Paesler

o.T., ca. 2002

o. t. (kleines moonshine-painting) by susanne paesler

Susanne Paesler

O. T. (kleines moonshine-painting), 2002

o.t. by susanne paesler

Susanne Paesler

O.T., 1994

Saturday, March 27, 2010Saturday, April 24, 2010


Berlin, Germany

Susanne Paesler
Karo und Mondschein

March 27 – April 24, 2010
Gallery hours Tuesday – Saturday, 11 am – 6 pm

Galerie Barbara Weiss is pleased to present its second solo exhibition of Susanne Paesler. The Berlin artist passed away four years ago. Even though she only lived to the age of 43, she left an impressively concise oeuvre, which carries forward and updates the history of painting on panels. Paesler used aluminium panels, which she painted with alcyd lacquer. In different steps, she sanded, polished and reapplied the paint until her paintings achieved a stunning, almost transparent luminosity.

The exhibition features works from two cycles of the artist’s oeuvre. The paintings from the argyle and checks series were created from 1992 to 1995. They are exemplary of the cool, ironic intellectualism with which Paesler approached her artistic project. At first, these paintings seem like rigid, non-objective compositions, like blends of classical abstraction and contemporary design. But then the viewer is almost overrun by their mimetic references to fabric patterns - and one can only see dish towels, table clothes, handkerchiefs, car seat covers or kilts from different periods of time. Some of them seem to come from the light and playful 1950s, some from the 1970s, when darker colors reigned. Paesler so intricately undermines the non-objective, that it reminds the viewer of something real again.

The moonlight landscapes – the second series of paintings featured in the exhibition – take this aesthetic mechanism to the extreme. Paesler created them in 2002, when she, supported by grant, travelled through New Zealand. The combining element of the paintings is the geometrical shape of a circle, which appears in different compositions. These compositions are made up of elements drawn from graphic design, of simultaneously organic and abstract translucent forms, and of almost Pollock-like drips. The combination of the pictorial elements creates landscapes that have no foundation in reality whatsoever and thus the viewer cannot free him- or herself from their illusory qualities.

Both series of paintings represent only a small part of Paesler’s oeuvre. Kunsthalle Kiel will present an exhibition from June to September 2010, featuring paintings from different cycles of the artist’s work.