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Art14    Feb 28 - Mar 2, 2014


Cynthia Reeves is pleased to participate in the 2nd edition of Art Fairs London, Art14, from February 28 – March 2, 2014, at Olympia London, (Booth #M2) The fair features work by Sarah Amos, Shen Chen, Lianghong Feng, Jonathan Prince, Danielle Julian Norton, and George Sherwood.

Lianghong Feng calls upon his dual influences of East and West in explaining his use of paint “daubing” and “splashing”. He used this signature style to paint his luscious abstract oils on canvas, currently on display at the Inside Out Museum in Beijing, the artist’s largest solo show to date. Feng is drawn to these techniques for their formal qualities and also their conceptual meaning. In the East, paint daubing is used to create grass portions in traditional Chinese landscape painting. In the West, Feng associates splashing with the prevalent graffiti he saw in New York City, a non-cultural and “irrational” form of painting he sees in complete contrast to the Chinese mindset. He combines both techniques in his work, seamlessly synthesizing influences traditionally in opposition with one another.

Harmony among formal elements is important to Feng. While he often allows his work on a painting to develop organically and intuitively, he is constantly looking for the “images” as he calls the different visual elements of his work, to maintain a relationship to one another—finding the painting’s artistic perspective.

Lianghong Feng has exhibited his work throughout Asia, in Europe and in the United States. In 2011 Feng had two solo exhibitions: It Is Not Eternal Toa: Abstract Paintings of Feng Lianghong at White Box Museum of Art in Beijing curated by Gu Zhenqing, and Feng Lianghong: Recent Abstract works curated by Martina Ziesse at Matthia Kuper in Beijing. He was recently in several group shows including Our Earth at Exhibition Hall and Great Weekend at the Today Art Museum, as well as Ullens Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing.

George Sherwood’s wall based sculpture, Untitled, 2014, is his newest wall-based indoor sculpture. In departure from his typical discs, this work features rectilinear elements, a geometrical foil for the work’s circular form, as a whole. The kinetic elements on the face of the artwork, fashioned in stainless steel, are finely pitched to respond to the slightest movement of air. The steel brings a lustrous reflectivity so that light and wind act in concert. It is a choreography based on inspiration and engineering. As Sherwood explains, “Each sculpture is a three-dimensional painting of shifting light, drawing all the colors of the environment, pulling down the sky, drawing up the earth and gathering everything in between. It is the light, after all, that we see and process, not the physical object.”

George Sherwood’s wall based sculpture, Untitled, 2014, is his newest wall-based indoor sculpture. In departure from his typical discs, this work features rectilinear elements, a geometrical foil for the work’s circular form, as a whole. The kinetic elements on the face of the artwork, fashioned in stainless steel, are finely pitched to respond to the slightest movement of air. The steel brings a lustrous reflectivity so that light and wind act in concert. It is a choreography based on inspiration and engineering. As Sherwood explains, “Each sculpture is a three-dimensional painting of shifting light, drawing all the colors of the environment, pulling down the sky, drawing up the earth and gathering everything in between. It is the light, after all, that we see and process, not the physical object.”

Sarah Amos is a master printmaker originally from Australia; the artist now splits her time between her native country and her home and studio in northern Vermont. She completed her most recent series, the Lunette and Black Box works, during a recent expedition to Lake Mungo National Park during the winter season. The body of work Amos produced after exploring Lake Mungo National Park won her a prestigious Joan Mitchell Grant.

Recounting her impressions of the landscape, Amos wrote, “Dead Black Box gums stood like soldiers throughout the park. Burnt out logs were abundant and placed in huge piles, which created fabulous graphic shapes against the waves of ochre sand…There was great life here, both ancient and modern, contrasted against tragedy, extreme hardship and now a discerning tranquility.” Like her previous work, the prints that she produced after the trip evoke the Australian landscape and a typical desert palette of burnt reds, sepia tones, lush blackness, and clear blues, and explore her interest in the natural and scientific worlds, ancient cultures, and geological oddities. Amos attended the Tamarind Institute of Lithography in Albuquerque, New Mexico where she became a collaborative Master Printer in Lithography. From 1994-2004 she was the Director and Master Printer at the Vermont Studio Center Press.

Recounting her impressions of the landscape, Amos wrote, “Dead Black Box gums stood like soldiers throughout the park. Burnt out logs were abundant and placed in huge piles, which created fabulous graphic shapes against the waves of ochre sand…There was great life here, both ancient and modern, contrasted against tragedy, extreme hardship and now a discerning tranquility.” Like her previous work, the prints that she produced after the trip evoke the Australian landscape and a typical desert palette of burnt reds, sepia tones, lush blackness, and clear blues, and explore her interest in the natural and scientific worlds, ancient cultures, and geological oddities. Amos attended the Tamarind Institute of Lithography in Albuquerque, New Mexico where she became a collaborative Master Printer in Lithography. From 1994-2004 she was the Director and Master Printer at the Vermont Studio Center Press.

American sculptor Jonathan Prince works primarily in steel, exploring the interface of various surfaces – patinated, torn, reticulated and high-polished – within the context of geometric forms. Recently, he began experimenting with more unusual materials like denim paper and felt, giving the artist new textures to mimic and respond to with his metalwork.

Prince writes: “Steel allows for an additive process; segments can be attached to the core material. As such - I am very excited by the notion that one can penetrate space by the additive of steel fabrication in ways that could never be done in stone carving, where the sculpture’s entire mass must be present in the initial stone block. This is actually the reason I was initially interested in exploring steel as a medium. A point of interest in my work is the idea that even though the steel work was created in an additive fashion, the sculpture has often been reduced from the complete form or geometry.”

Prince’s Vestigial Block I, a Torn Steel Series sculpture measuring six by six by six feet (1.8 x 1.8 x 1.8 meters), was recently acquired for the permanent collection of the Eli and Edyth Broad Art Museum in East Lansing, Michigan. Exhibitions include a solo show in 2010 at CYNTHIA-REEVES Gallery in New York City; an installation of monumental steel works at the Sculpture Garden at 590 Madison Avenue in 2011; permanent installation of his iconic work, Light Box, as part of the Edward J. Minskoff collection. Currently, Prince has two iconic works from his black granite series on view in at Pier 64, in the Hudson River Park, adjacent to 24th Street in Chelsea.



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