Downtown Art Fair

Downtown Art Fair

Thursday, May 8, 2014Sunday, May 11, 2014

69th Regiment Armory
68 Lexington Ave.

New York, NY 10010 USA

CYNTHIA-REEVES (Booth, DT19) is pleased to announce its participation in the inaugural edition of The Downtown Fair, running concurrent with Frieze New York, from May 8 – 11, 2014. Located at the historic 69th Regiment Armory, at Lexington Avenue and 25th Street, CYNTHIA-REEVES will feature a curated selection of dimensional wall and floor-based works by an array of international artists; Sarah Amos, Shen Chen, Lianghong Feng, Lorrie Fredette, Jonathan Prince, Shuli Sade, George Sherwood, and introducing the multi-media artist, Anne Spalter.

For twenty years, the dual influences of East and West have manifested in Lianghong Feng’s luscious abstract canvases. His techniques of daubing and splashing paint are the vehicle through which these two disparate traditions are resolved. These dynamic, abstract paintings draw from his Chinese roots, including the legacy of Chinese calligraphy.

1 MEDIA ALERT Contact: Sara Sharvit Marketing/Sales Director (212) 714 0044 ssharvit@cynthia-reeves.com April 25, 2014 CYNTHIA-REEVES (Booth, DT19) is pleased to announce its participation in the inaugural edition of The Downtown Fair, running concurrent with Frieze New York, from May 8 – 11, 2014. Located at the historic 69th Regiment Armory, at Lexington Avenue and 25th Street, CYNTHIA-REEVES will feature a curated selection of dimensional wall and floor-based works by an array of international artists; Sarah Amos, Shen Chen, Lianghong Feng, Lorrie Fredette, Jonathan Prince, Shuli Sade, George Sherwood, and introducing the multi-media artist, Anne Spalter. For twenty years, the dual influences of East and West have manifested in Lianghong Feng’s luscious abstract canvases. His techniques of daubing and splashing paint are the vehicle through which these two disparate traditions are resolved. These dynamic, abstract paintings draw from his Chinese roots, including the legacy of Chinese calligraphy. After a decade residence in New York City, during the 1990s, Feng began distorting the shapes of the urbanscape, in direct reaction to the prevalent graffiti he saw in Brooklyn. This inspired a non-cultural and “irrational” form of painting. He wrote: “I must avoid my pre-existing knowledge and constructs, and enter my personal terra incognita.” While Feng often allows his work on a painting to develop organically and intuitively, he is constantly looking for the “images”, or what he terms the different visual elements of his work, and to elaborate relationships among them. This is part of his process of finding the painting’s artistic perspective, harmony. Feng was recently the subject of a major mid-career retrospective at Beijing’s Inside Out Museum and the White Box Museum of Art.

Define Happiness, and Stimulating Euphoria, an ongoing work-in-progress from New York multimedia artist Shuli Sade, will ultimately include a large-scale installation and video art created from the photography Sade took, which is the basis for the body of work. Sade began the series by producing generously scaled works on paper.

“I travel between media, inspired to work with repeated imagery with different tools,” the artist said. Sade, a recent recipient Pollack-Krasner Foundation Grant for her Engrams series, hand drawn ink on Mylar works sized 60 x 110 inches. These colossal images are the remains of decoded photographs of urban settings shot from the New York Times building in Manhattan during nighttime.

The limited edition Define Happiness, and Stimulating Euphoria prints, are digitally manipulated photographs made of visual data removed and re-inserted to photographic cityscapes. “My work is inspired by cities, planning, memory, and networks. Transforming recorded data to a signal system creates layers of [symbolic] memory: Each layer has a certain number of signals from the original photograph of a place in a certain time. Following my collaboration with Neural Scientists on the topic of memory, my present visual research is inspired by the function of dopamine, serotonin, oxytocin and endorphins and their roll in the brain’s ability to experience pleasure, feel rewarded, and maintain focus,” the artist explains. Sade shot the images in midtown NYC at night.

Shen Chen, who divides his time between New York City and Beijing, recapitulates the meditative and deliberative brushwork associated with traditional Chinese ink brush painting. Chen’s current vernacular, however, is decidedly contemporary. His fully abstract paintings are a study in line, color, and tonality, and reference the aesthetic of 1960’s minimalism. Chen is fascinated by the permanence of brushwork within the ink-painting process; every time the brush touches the paper, its mark is permanently recorded. Chen’s current paintings continue his study of the disciplined mark-making process and, in the most recent work, he continues to favor acrylic paint on unfinished canvas. “[Chen] discovered that acrylic could give him an even richer expression than Chinese ink without compromising the essence of ink. The painting surface is covered in carefully arranged layers upon layers, sometimes in color, sometimes in black and white,” writes Zhi Kong, independent Beijing-based curator and critic.

Shen Chen’s newest exhibition of meditative acrylic on canvas paintings opened April 12 at the Mingyuan Museam in Shanghai. The exhibition, entitled Another Utopia, Abstract Art: Shanghai, is on view through May 10, 2014. Additionally, work on paper from Chen’s archive can also be seen in A Fragment in the Course of Time—Landscape of Chinese Ink Art in the 1980s, recently on view at the Himalayas Museum, also in Shanghai.