Conny Dietzschold Gallery, Sydney - Cologne

Kuno Gonschior

Kuno Gonschior

green/black/white landscape by kuno gonschior

Kuno Gonschior

Green/Black/White Landscape, 2007

magenta landscape by kuno gonschior

Kuno Gonschior

Magenta Landscape, 2007

Tuesday, June 3, 2014Saturday, July 19, 2014

99 Crown Street
Sydney, NSW 2010 Australia

Kuno Gonschior

Conny Dietzschold Gallery presents the extraordinary paintings of the late German artist Kuno Gonschior. For over fifty years, Kuno Gonschior explored the properties of colour through a constellation of strokes, spots and dabs of paint. His vibrant layers of paint and subtle colour variation are reminiscent of Impressionist painter Claude Monet and Abstract Expressionist Mark Rothko resulting in a sort of chromatic alchemy.
A first take on these paintings is to imagine a confluence of George Seurat and Mark Rothko resulting in pointillist abstract expressionism. Kuno Gonschior explicitly finds his way to comprehensive color relationships by applying multitudinous dabs of paint to create it. In essence this leaves a certain measure of the ground peeping through; but any figure/ground relationship is nevertheless left unresolved. The minute color relationships are accessible even as the larger relationships are created. It is interesting to note how density is subtly arrived at depending on how and where the paint is combined. Blue in some paintings, for example, is not simply a color but a carefully constructed perception of the hue which then defines the reality. Because Gonschior never let go of the physicality of the paint; indeed it’s celebrated, the paintings have it both ways.

The subject matter suggests landscapes (similar to how Rothko’s paintings do so) where an undefined sense of space is established. You look deep into these non-focused works which only hint at distant horizons. It’s not important that you can’t definitively locate the latter because everything is brought into play here the close space, the suggestion of distant horizons but especially the atmosphere. From this perspective an admittedly oblique connection can be made between these paintings and Cezanne’s in that space is simultaneously presented as distant and ‘flattened out’ via the approach. Really though, Gonschior’s content is aimed at bridging the science and art of perception while also ‘releasing’ color to its full potential without relying on form. There is a refreshing quality this work projects due to the bright hues doubling up on themselves and the bits of the ground which is captured in earth tones. Each sets the other off to delicious and stimulating effect. Gonschior is another of those artists that can be described as minimalist for his forms but as a sensualist for everything else and which ultimately wins out. Time is a key factor for understanding this work; these pieces require a certain measure of it to fully reveal themselves. Initially they may appear as slight variations on a theme but after awhile the nuances become more differentiated.

Joseph Walentini