Sixty Years of British Art (New York)

Sixty Years of British Art (New York)

figure with path by graham sutherland

Graham Sutherland

Figure with Path, 1950

Wednesday, March 2, 2011Saturday, April 30, 2011


London, United Kingdom

Bernard Jacobson Gallery is delighted to announce the opening of its new gallery in New York at 17 East 71st Street, in March 2011.

Our inaugural exhibition, Sixty Years of British Art, draws on Bernard Jacobson’s experiences as a dealer in British and international art since the opening of his first gallery in London in 1969. Featuring works from a diverse list of artists which includes Frank Auerbach, Peter Blake, Anthony Caro, Harold Cohen, Jason Martin, Bruce McLean, Henry Moore, Ben Nicholson, Nicholas Pope, Bridget Riley, Graham Sutherland, William Tillyer and Marc Vaux, this will be a personal look at some of the more interesting aspects of British art of the 20th and 21st centuries.

The show’s earliest work is a painting by Graham Sutherland (1903-1980) entitled Figure with Path, 1950. A Neo-Romantic, associated with Francis Bacon and inspired by the English pastoral tradition, Sutherland is best known for his haunting landscapes and hybrid human-organic forms. His paintings are often characterized by spiky, thorny forms, dramatic shifts in light and unnaturalistic colouring.

Other significant mid-century pieces include a bronze figure by Eduardo Paolozzi (1924-2005), an abstract relief by Ben Nicholson (1894-1982), a steel sculpture by Anthony Caro (born 1924) and a coloured gouache, on graph paper, by Bridget Riley (born 1931).

Pioneer of British abstraction, Ben Nicholson, is represented by Greek and Two Circles, 1961, exemplifying English modernism with its formal simplicity and naturalistic colours. Nicholson, editor of the constructivist Circle Magazine, applied constructivist principles to his art, advocating mathematical precision, clean lines and an absence of ornament.

Anthony Caro’s Table Piece, 1968, belongs to a group of works executed between 1966 and 1969 in response to a growing tendency for sculptors to place their work directly on the ground. In the artist’s own words: "My Table pieces are not models inhabiting a pretence world, but relate to a person like a cup or a jug. Since the edge is basic to the table all the Table Pieces make use of this edge which itself becomes an integral element of the Piece."(1)

Further works of note include: two drawings - one ink and one pencil - by David Hockney (born 1937); an oil on wood and a gouache by Howard Hodgkin (born 1932); a small head by Frank Auerbach (born 1931); recent paintings by William Tillyer (born 1938), Marc Vaux (born 1932) and Jason Martin (born 1970); and a video piece by the Scottish performance artist and painter, Bruce McLean (born 1944).

William Tillyer portrays a world in motion; turbulent - at once emerging and dissolving - and expressed in colours ranging from the deep and dense to the positively ethereal.

Marc Vaux’s wall mounted relief sculpture is made from mass produced anodised aluminium section and meticulously spray-painted MDF board, where brightly pigmented fillets reflect coloured light across cool white surfaces.

The show’s most recent work is by Jason Martin, famous for his large monochrome paintings in oil on stainless steel, aluminium or Perspex. He uses fine, specially made comb-like tools to move the wet paint across the entire surface in one movement thereby creating striations and large swirls and waves.

This exhibition is not an attempt to provide a comprehensive survey of British art of the last sixty years. It is, rather, a personal look at the artists who have been important to Bernard Jacobson, whose work he has been supporting and exhibiting, since he opened his first gallery in 1969.

Notes to Editors:
The Bernard Jacobson Gallery was founded in 1969 and is a major dealer specialising in modern and contemporary British and international art. The London gallery is situated in the central district of Mayfair. The gallery has two exhibition floors and a graphics department all within 6 Cork Street. In March 2011 Bernard Jacobson Gallery opens a new space in New York at 17 East 71st Street.

Listings Information for New York:
Bernard Jacobson Gallery
17 East 71st Street
3rd Floor
New York, NY 10021
Tel 212 879 1100

mail@jacobsongallery.com
www.jacobsongallery.com

Opening Hours: Tuesday to Saturday 10am to 6pm.

For further information regarding the exhibition, please contact Diana Erdos, diana@jacobsongallery.com or Tel 212 879 1100.

(1) Anthony Caro in an unpublished statement 1966/67, as quoted in Ian Barker,
Quest for the New Sculpture, page 161.