Coherent Surface, Radiant Light (New York)

Coherent Surface, Radiant Light (New York)

#1246-07 by vicky colombet

Vicky Colombet

#1246-07, 2007–2012

Price on Request

Friday, May 11, 2012Friday, August 31, 2012


London, United Kingdom

Larry Bell, Jake Berthot, Bram Bogart, Vicky Colombet, Rudolf de Crignis, James Hayward, Kazimira Rachfal, William Tillyer, Marc Vaux

Bernard Jacobson Gallery, New York, is pleased to announce their upcoming exhibition: Coherent Surface, Radiant Light, opening on May 1st, 2012. There will be an opening reception on May 11th.

The exhibition explores the artistic objective to depict light, an endeavor that has important historical antecedents. In Cézanne’s opinion light could not be reproduced, “but must be represented by something else, color”. The Fauvists, aware that a painter’s pigments, when mixed are duller than light, developed the practice of using colors pure, as they come out of the tube. Ben Nicholson considered the color of light to be white and Malevich described white as the color of the infinite and the primordial.

Vicky Colombet paints subjects in which light is a major presence. Her works evoke the way that light is fractured by the surfaces of water and earth, laying bare the structure of replicating natural forms. This is achieved by means of color and tone control using a restricted palette of white on white, grey on white and aqua blues.

Marc Vaux, an early teacher in England of perception theory as it relates to color, brings our attention to the experience of color as light. His starting point is a luminous white surface on which color is projected from narrow strips of brightly painted beading, creating in Vaux’s words: “transient and fugitive zones of color.”

Larry Bell has evolved a surface that constantly changes with ambient light. Seemingly floating at body height on clear pedestals, his glass cube sculptures have been treated with a thin film of vaporized metallic particles, a coating that has the ability to absorb and reflect light within and without the cube structure.

Rudolf de Crignis’s monochrome surfaces are airy and radiant. Starting with a white ground and subsequently many thin layers and colors of oil paint, the artist creates a structure to hold the light by brushing the paint in alternating horizontal and vertical layers. Light pierces the structure and is reflected back by the initial coat of white ground, producing the illusion of deep space.

Bram Bogart’s gestural surfaces invite the interplay of light. The artist creates an internal coherence through the weight and density of physically massive accumulations of a pigmented cement-like substance. Over time the paintings have increased in color saturation to achieve a purity of brightness.

On a ground of azure green/blue Kazimira Rachfal overlays a field of scratched gold. The light it emits is hard won. It glimmers on the surface, slips along the edges, is caught in the seams that join shape to shape and color to color. The tone is un-emphatic, bare boned but packed to bursting.

Jake Berthot makes light positive by giving it a dark context to play in. He paints a primordial forest in which the daybreak brings light that enters the painting as a patch of blue sky. Quite literally, light is color and color is light. His stated concern is to “paint silence before it completely disappears.”

William Tillyer is a painter of light. His artistic intention is to reposition English landscape painting, creating new relevance for this art form by dissolving the barrier between nature and the evidence of man who is seen as a part of nature. Nowhere is this better evidenced than in his recent relief paintings where a surface of manifestly man made panels provide the support for flowing translucent color, evoking sky, clouds or sun light.

For more information about this exhibition, please contact Diana Erdos: 212 879 1100 diana@jacobsongallery.com.