Elisabeth Frink, Beaux Arts represents the artist's estate

Elisabeth Frink, Beaux Arts represents the artist's estate

horizontal birdman i by elisabeth frink

Elisabeth Frink

Horizontal Birdman I, 1962

Price on Request

man and baboon by elisabeth frink

Elisabeth Frink

Man and Baboon, 1990

Price on Request

seated nude by elisabeth frink

Elisabeth Frink

Seated Nude, 1982

Price on Request

horse and rider by elisabeth frink

Elisabeth Frink

Horse and Rider, 1969

Price on Request

man running ii by elisabeth frink

Elisabeth Frink

Man Running II, 1976

Price on Request

goggle head ii (teeth) by elisabeth frink

Elisabeth Frink

Goggle Head II (Teeth), 1969

Price on Request

birdman by elisabeth frink

Elisabeth Frink

Birdman, ca. 1960

Price on Request

elisabeth frink, beaux arts represents the artist's estate

Elisabeth Frink, Beaux Arts represents the artist's estate

Price on Request

Wednesday, April 10, 2013Saturday, May 18, 2013


London, United Kingdom

On 18 April 1993 Elisabeth Frink died at the age of just 62. Now, twenty years after her death Beaux Arts presents an anniversary exhibition in conjunction with Lund Humphries’ publication of the first complete catalogue raisonné of her sculpture. The catalogue is fully illustrated with reproductions of over 400 works, many previously unpublished, and fascinating images of Frink at work in her studio.

Frink’s reputation in Europe and America was established during her twenties. Bird, 1952 was bought and cast into bronze for both the Tate and Arts Council collections, around the same time her Man with Bird Maquette, 1952 became short listed for the ‘Unknown Political Prisoner’ competition. Birdman, 1959 (similar to the sculpture in photo on the left) was one of the many sculpture commissions she received for post-war rebuilding schemes in London.

From the time that Frink established her first studio in Park Walk in London photographers and filmmakers were attracted to her. The photographs and film of Frink from this period are beguiling in their paradoxes. People who met her were attracted to this young woman who was working within the shadows of war, conflict and vulnerability and yet oozed femininity, charm and vibrancy. The exhibition at Beaux Arts will be a testament to her unique voice, showing sculptures, paintings and drawings that span over 4 decades of her life.

The relevance of her work remains as strong as ever in a world where humankind maintains a sense of its vulnerability. Here, uncertainty and injustice meet with hope.