Rodger Jacobsen  (American) 

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Rodger Jacobsen, The Reader

 

Rodger Jacobsen
The Reader
Glenn Green Galleries
Rodger Jacobsen, Slumber (Keats)

 

Rodger Jacobsen
Slumber (Keats)
Glenn Green Galleries
Rodger Jacobsen, Long Gone

 

Rodger Jacobsen
Long Gone
Glenn Green Galleries
Rodger Jacobsen, HOWDY

 

Rodger Jacobsen
HOWDY
2010

Glenn Green Galleries
  

  Rodger Jacobsen’s sculpture is at once inspiring, amusing and quite frankly, amazing. Inspiring, in the beautiful classical forms he creates in a modern style, amusing, in certain pieces which make witty statements, and amazing, because he works primarily in steel that he says, “is great material to manipulate and play with.” In his talented hands, this unyielding medium is as malleable as clay.
  A well-known sculptor, Jacobsen has devoted his life to his art. He travels widely and teaches life drawing at City College of San Francisco. His work has been exhibited and collected internationally.
  Artist Statements:
  "I don’t think I ever start a sculpture with a very strong idea of how it ends up: steel is a great material to manipulate and play with…stretch, bend, add, subtract, chop, flatten, the improvisations are endless. That was what I did with it, often hanging the pieces up with a wire and trying to figure a way to get them to come down to the ground so they could stand up. While I was playing this way I found that when the forms were juxtaposed in just the right way forms often appeared to be weightless and I tried to emphasize this aspect.
  I also found that I am really interested in form and the space surrounding it and I would spend hours adjusting volume and placement in small degrees to get it right.
  In the nineties I started playing around with the figure, I had thousands of life drawings and I worked from them. All my figure sculpture comes from drawing, generally keeping pose times to twenty minutes or less. I don’t find longer poses very interesting but a five - minute drawing is packed with information that I can use.
  The figure reinforced my interest in form, I can adjust and refine forever. There is another feature of steel that I always thought about but never taken advantage of the fact that steel is a sheet, not a volume and my forms had usually been closed giving the impression of solid volumes. Now I looked for opportunities to open the form and let the steel act as a skin. Much of my most recent work is open; the figure may just be a slip or gown. This in turn leads to an interest in drapery, which goes hand In hand with movement. I am finding this a rich vein to mine, and it certainly has been productive."
  Krannart Museum, University of Illinois
  DeYoung Museum, San Francisco
  International Exhibition of Pioneering Art Galleries, Lausanne, Switzerland
  The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
  La Jolla Art Center, La Jolla, California
  Oakland Museum of Art, Oakland, California
  University of New Mexico Art Gallery, Albuquerque, New Mexico
  Sausalito Civic Center, Sausalito, California
  Hyatt Hotels: Lisle, Illinois, Dulles, Virginia and Fairfield, Virginia
  St. Mary’s College, Moraga, California
  San Francisco Art Institute
  San Francisco Museum of Art
  Frank Lloyd Wright Civic Center, Marin County, California
  Berkeley Art Center, Berkeley, California
  Central Missouri State College
  South Dakota Memorial Art Center
  University of Delaware
  Hyde Park Center, Chicago, Illinois
  Red River Art Center, Moorhead, Minnesota