Louis Icart (French, 1888–1950) is considered to be a symbol of the Art Deco movement through his brilliant sketches and prints. He was born in Toulouse, France, as the first child of Jean and Elisabeth Icart. His interest in art began at an early age; he was particularly drawn to fashion sketches and designs. This was a time when the fashion industry was undergoing a revolution from the conservative 19th century designs to the clingy simplicity of early 20th century. Icart worked in major fashion studios where his L.I. initials on women's clothing were highly regarded. He continued to sketch on every available surface while fighting in the First World War to ward off the anguish and agony of the war. He moved to Paris after the war to concentrate on painting and producing beautiful etchings. Icart’s prints were aquatints and drypoints elaborately done with great skill. They portrayed women in sensual erotic poses with an implication of direct sexuality.

By the 1920s, the Art Deco movement had gained great popularity in Paris, France. Icart's etchings and paintings, though largely influenced by Impressionists such as Claude Monet (French, 1840–1926), were synonymous with the Art Deco era. His drawings also reflect the brilliance of Symbolists such as Gustave Moreau (French, 1826–1898). However, Icart preferred not to be identified with artistic and Contemporary Art movements. Icart's success financially and artistically came in the late 1920s.

His work was featured in fashion publications and design studios in Europe and the United States. His immensely popular images, which were considered phenomenal by 1925, included Laziness and Spilled Milk. Current exhibits of Icart paintings include Paresse, which was exhibited at the RoGallery in Long Island, NY, and the Le Cachet in Binningen, Switzerland. His paintings are also featured at the Modern and Contemporary gallery in Fort Myers, FL. Hand-signed colored engravings by Icart can also be found at the Fine Arts Gallery Alte Kunste in Vienna, Austria, and at Zygman Voss Gallery in Chicago, IL. Icart died on December 20, 1950 at his home in Montmartre, France.

Timeline

1888
Born in Toulouse, France
1950
Died in Paris, France
Lived in New York City, famous for his Art-Deco

Exhibitions