Ad Reinhardt (American, 1913–1967), famous for his black paintings, was a painter associated with the Abstract Expressionists. Born in Buffalo, NY, Reinhardt studied Art History with Meyer Shapiro at Columbia University, which had a profound influence on both his painting and his writing. In the 1930s, like many New York artists, Reinhardt served as a painter for the Works Progress Administration, which allowed him to meet other artists and to join and exhibit with the American Abstract Artists’ Association.

Reinhardt also exhibited in group and solo exhibitions at the Peggy Guggenheim Gallery in New York before regularly holding solo exhibits at the Betty Parsons Gallery, the space around which the Abstract Expressionist movement was centered. In the 1960s, Reinhardt reduced his geometric paintings into grids of subtly different shades of black; he painted exclusively black works until his death. Throughout his career, Reinhardt was also a prolific writer on the aesthetic role of Abstract Art; he wrote critical texts for journals and created thousands of cartoons and illustrations. The artist died in 1967.

Timeline

1913
Born, Buffalo, NY
1931–1935
Studied art history under Meyer Schapiro at Columbia University, New York
1936–1937
Studied painting with Carl Holty and Francis Criss at the American Artists School
1967
Died, New York City

Exhibitions

2010
Ad Reinhardt / Louise Nevelson: A Dialogue, ScheiblerMitte, Berlin
2003–2004
Barbara Mathes Gallery, New York
1999
Marlborough Gallery, New York
1991
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
1985
Staatsgalerie Stuttgart, Germany
1984
The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
1981
The Pace Gallery, New York
1980
The Solomon R. Guggenheim, Museum, New York
1977
Staatliche Kunsthalle, Baden-Baden, Germany
1972
Traveling exhibition, Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, the Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven; Kunsthaus Zürich; Centre National d’Art Contemporain, Paris; and Museum des 20. Jahrhunderts, Vienna.
1970
Marlborough Gallery, New York
1966
Jewish Museum, New York
1946–1965
Exhibited with Betty Parsons Gallery, New York