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Artnet News
7/11/02


GLASS MUSEUM OPENS IN TACOMA
The West Coast's most dramatic new museum is the $48 million, 75,000-square-foot Museum of Glass: International Center for Contemporary Art in Tacoma, Wash., which opened to the public on July 6, 2002. Designed by Canadian architect Arthur Erickson, the Modernist concrete and glass building features a tilted 90-foot cone wrapped in stainless steel, inspired by the wood burners of sawmills that once dotted the region. Under the cone is a working glass studio, where museum visitors can watch the "choreographed teamwork of artists from all disciplines experimenting with glass," according to museum director Josi Callan. Inaugural exhibitions at the museum include monumental glass sculptures by Jaroslava Brychtová and the late Stanislav Libenský plus non-glass works by Mark Tobey, Morris Graves and John Cage. Also dedicated during the museum's grand opening were two major public art projects: Howard Ben Tré's Water Forest, an array of bronze-and-glass towers at the city's waterfront esplanade, and the 500-foot-long Chihuly Bridge of Glass by Dale Chihuly. For more info, see www.museumofglass.org.

YIKES, STRIPES, AT POMPIDOU CENTER
French Conceptual Artist Daniel Buren, 64, is the star of the Pompidou Center this summer, where his retrospective, "The Museum Which Did Not Exist," fills the museum's sixth floor galleries. Since 1965, in search of "the last painting," Buren has been famous for covering any type of surface, from paintings to walls to flags on the roofs of Paris and waistcoats for the museum attendants, with awning-like stripes that measure exactly 8.7 centimeters wide. The exhibition, organized by Bernard Blistène, Alison Gingeras and Laurent Lebon, is on view June 26-Sept. 23, 2002.

COUNTRIFIED ART
Over 70 artists are embracing rural Americana as part of the Brewster Project 2002, the second annual collaboration between the New York City art world and the upstate New York village of Brewster, July 22-28, 2002. A group of 14 curators selected the artist-participants, who are siting work in the town's shops, alleyways, storefronts, train station, library and elsewhere. Among the projects are an interdenominational choir organized by Olu Oguibe in conjunction with seven area churches, a special art proposal by Brewster Residency artist Maureen Connor in the Walter Brewster House, a bust of Brewster mayor John Cesar by Michael Keropian and a magazine created especially for Brewster by Dutch artist Peter Spaans. The project is organized by Regine Basha, Christopher K. Ho and Omar Lopez-Chahoud, for more info email ckh7@columbia.edu or visit www.brewsterproject.com.

MEDIA CITY SEOUL 2002
The city of Seoul is sponsoring Media City Seoul 2002, an international biennial on technology and contemporary art held at the newly renovated Seoul Museum of Art and public sites around Seoul, Sept. 26-Nov. 24, 2002. First held in 2000, the biennial is organized by artistic director Wonil Rhee, former chief curator of the Sungkok Art Museum and managing director of the 3rd Gwangju Biennale, with curators Marie de Brugerolle, Michael Cohen, Du Huang, Gregor Jansen, Kim Machan, Dean Gunalan Nadarajan and Azumaya Takashi. Eighty artists are slated to take part, including U.S. artists Cody Choi, Miltos Manetas, Joseph Nechvatal and Jennifer Steinkamp.

QUIET ART PROJECT AT GROUND ZERO
While government, real estate and other groups confer on plans for rebuilding the World Trade Center site, New York street artist Dan Witz has quietly installed his own memorial on the bases of lightposts around the neighborhood. Witz's project features a small sticker showing a simple, lit-candle reliquary resting on a carved plinth; he's installed about 40 stickers in the downtown area. Witz is known for large-scale realist paintings as well as street works, which in the past have included images of humming birds and, more ominously, posters of sweatshirt-hooded drug dealers.

GLASSTIRE IN TEXAS
Art lovers in Texas with cyber-connections go to Glasstire, an online magazine of Texas art founded by 29-year-old Houston editor Rainey Knudson in 2001. In addition to reviews, news and a lively message board, Glasstire now includes an interview by Christopher French with Michael Auping and Marla Price, director and chief curator of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, on the museum's deluxe new Tadao Ando-designed facility, slated to open on Dec. 14, 2002. Glasstire is reportedly named after a sculpture of same by native Texan Robert Rauschenberg.

NEW WEBSITE FOR PHOTO PORTRAITS
New York dealer Barry Neuman, who operates the hip Modern Culture gallery out of the Gershwin Hotel on East 27th Street, has launched a new enterprise -- 20 21 Photo, an online gallery devoted to portraits of artists by photographers. The online catalogue and "virtual exhibition space" at www.2021photo.com (and on Artnet as well) features photos by Michael Halsband of Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat and pictures by Nicholas Sinclair of contemporary British artists.

SID AVERY, 1918-2002
Sid Avery, 83, iconic Hollywood photographer of the 1950s and '60s, died of cancer in Los Angeles on July 1, 2002. His books include Hollywood at Home: A Family Album 1950-1965 (1990). He exhibited in several museums and galleries, including Staley & Wise in New York and Apex Fine Art in Los Angeles.



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