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Artnet News
4/11/05


FLOATING NAMES IN LOS ANGELES
Two Los Angeles museums -- the Getty Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art -- are now beginning their search for new directors, and a story in the Los Angeles Times by Suzanne Muchnic has floated the names of some potential candidates. According to the report, supercollector Eli Broad has already approached several people to discuss the job at LACMA's new Broad Contemporary Art Museum, including former San Francisco MOMA and Whitney Museum director David Ross, Dia Center for the Arts director Michael Govan, Columbia University art school dean Bruce Ferguson and Guggenheim Museum deputy director Lisa Dennison. Candidates for the post at the Getty, which is said to be more likely to hire a European director because of its international art programs, include British Museum head Neil MacGregor and Susan Ferleger Brades, former director of the Hayward Gallery in London; other possibilities, according to the Times, are Virginia Museum of Fine Arts director Michael Brand and Art Institute of Chicago curator Douglas Druick. Stay tuned.

NO SALE FOR HECKSCHER MUSEUM
The Heckscher Museum of Art in Huntington, Long Island, has abandoned its plans to sell George Grosz's 1926 painting, Eclipse of the Sun, to raise funds for a proposed $16-million museum expansion, according to a report by Benjamin Genocchio in the New York Times. Heckscher board chair Margy Hargraves said that adverse local and media reaction had led to the decision. An unidentified buyer offered $19 million for the painting, which is regarded as the museum's most valuable artwork (he recently lowered his price to $13 million-$14 million, more in line with market appraisals). Museum ethics codes generally prohibit the sale of artworks to fund museum operations. The Heckscher says it hopes to go ahead with the expansion, and put the Grosz painting permanently on view.

MOMA CURATOR MAKES "TIME 100"
Museum of Modern Art chief curator of painting and sculpture John Elderfield has made the "Time 100," Time magazine's list of the 100 most influential people in the world. "With final say over what happens in the museum's galleries, writes Time's Richard Lacayo of Elderfield, "he has carefully expanded a story that was threatening to harden into a narrow orthodoxy." No artist made the list, though it includes architect Santiago Calatrava and designer Marc Newson.

FRANK GEHRY'S LATEST OPENS IN MAY
Frank Gehry's newest art museum, MARTa Herford, opens with "(My Private) Heroes," May 8-Aug. 14, 2005, which is billed as a survey of artistic heroes since the late 19th century. Gehry's 7,000-square-meter building began with an existing industrial building and added a pair of new structures done in the architects trademark "ribbon" style in stainless steel and local red brick. Located in the German furniture center of Herford in the German state of North-Rhine-Westphalia, the museum is under the artistic direction of celebrity museum director Jan Hoet.

Part museum of art and design, part industry center, MARTa Herford is building its own art and design collection, ranging from Art & Language to Manfred Pernice and Robert Wilson, and holds as well paintings from the 1970s and '80s on loan from Bielefeld collector Karl Kerber. Coming up are exhibitions of Pascale Marhine Tayou and Marten van Severen, and a "Herford Salon" designed by Berlin artist Anton Henning.

JANKOWSKI SURVEY IN DES MOINES
The Des Moines Art Center is giving New York-based German artist Christian Jankowski a major survey show this summer. "Christian Jankowski," June 22-Aug. 28, 2005, is organized by Des Moines senior curator Jeff Fleming and includes 13 major filmic or video installations plus 54 photographs. Among the works is 16mm Mystery (2004), which was co-produced by the center and made in collaboration with Hollywood special effects wizards, the Strause Brothers. The exhibition, which is accompanied by a 200-page catalogue, is scheduled to travel to the MIT List Visual Arts Center in Cambridge, Oct. 14-Dec. 30, 2005, and the Foundation for Art and Creative Technology in Liverpool, Feb. 9-Apr. 2, 2006.

FERNWOOD TO FULLER BUILDING
The art-as-investment sector of the art world seems to be growing. Fernwood Art Investments has opened headquarters in the Fuller Building, and added three more consultants to its list: Latin American art dealer Mary-Anne Martin, principal of Mary-Anne Martin Fine Art; Chinese art dealer James J. Lally, founder of J.J. Lally & Co. Oriental Art; and Anna Sokoloff, the former Christie's Latin American art expert who recently launched her own art advisory firm, Sokoloff + Associates LLC. The new office is located on the 35th floor of the Fuller Building at 595 Madison Avenue.

OPEN CALL AT ART IN GENERAL
The indefatigable Tribeca-based alternative space Art in General has issued an open call for artists to apply for as many as 10 commissions to make new works to be shown during 2005-06 in the sixth-floor gallery or the street-level project space. Funds ranging from $6,000-$10,000 are available for research, production and installation. Applications are due May 15, 2005; for details, see www.artingeneral.org.

WHITE COLUMNS AT W HOTEL
White Columns has teamed up with the W Hotel in Times Square to present an exhibition of 3D photographic constructions by Bay Area artist Sean McFarland. The exhibition can be found in the hotel's seventh-floor "Living Room" at Broadway and 47th Street. For more info, see www.whappenings.com.

LICHTENSTEIN GIFT TO NGA
Pop Art master Roy Lichtenstein's widow and sons -- Dorothy, David and Mitchell -- plus the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation have donated 13 drawings by the artist to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The gift honors Jane Meyerhoff, who died last October, and consists of drawing related to paintings in the NGA's Meyerhoff collection. The drawings go on view Apr. 23-July 24, 2005.

"ROOT TO THE FRUIT" AT KAGAN GALLERY
Art critic and curator David Hunt has organized "From the Root to the Fruit," Apr. 16-May 28, 2005, at Alona Kagan Gallery on West 29th Street in New York's Chelsea art district. Titled after a phrase from John 15:5, an expression that the curator says has come to mean "the unadulterated truth," the show "returns to the basics of curatorial display, allowing art to do what it does best." That is, the viewer gets "the real deal" and is able to pass "from the root to the fruit." Fourteen artists -- the majority painters -- are included: Claudine Anrather, Gabriel Bennett, Jane Benson, Jesse Bercowetz & Matt Bua, Maureen Cavanaugh, SunTek Chung, Micah Ganske, Jeffrey Gibson, Iva Gueorguieva, Nicholas Lamia, Tim Maxwell, Eric Sall, Pawel Wojtasik and Ana Wolovick.

FRENCH DRAWINGS TO CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA.
The University of Virginia Art Museum in Charlottesville, Va., is exhibiting "Masterpieces of European Drawing," Apr. 9-June 5, 2005, a show of 61 works from the Muse des Beaux-Arts et dArchologie in Besanon, France. The survey includes works by Boucher, Courbet, David, Delacroix, Greuze, Mantegna, Matisse, Rubens and Rembrandt. For more info, see www.Virginia.edu/museum.

ART LOVERS NEW YORK GOES ONLINE
Former Artnet Magazine people photographer Nancy Smith has launched her own website, Art Lovers New York, with her trademark portraits of downtown gallery goers along with studio visits (Carol Bove is on the schedule) and music and film reviews. See www.artloversnewyork.com.


Contact wrobinson @ artnet.com