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Artnet News
10/28/04


GAGOSIAN, BRANT SETTLE WITH IRS
Art dealer Larry Gagosian and collector Peter Brant have settled their dispute with the IRS by agreeing to pay the government a total of $9.1 million, according to a report in the Baer Faxt. Early last year, the U.S. attorneys office in New York sued the pair for $26.5 million, claiming that they dodged taxes on a 1990 deal for about 60 works from the holdings of famed California collector Richard Weisman [see "Artnet News," Mar. 21, 2003].

ART COLOGNE GEARS UP
The 38th installment of Art Cologne opens to the public, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, 2004, with 250 modern and contemporary galleries, about 140 from Germany and the rest from 20 other countries. Like many of the older fairs, Art Cologne is striving to enliven its program to compete with the London and Miami Beach fairs, and this years initiatives include new video rooms, which will be set up beside gallery stands, and "New Museums," a show of architectural projects for new museum buildings, including Tadao Ando's project for the Langen Foundation in Neuss and Frank Gehry's MARTa in Herford. For details, see www.artcologne.com

RED MANSION ART PRIZE EXHIBITION IN LONDON
The "Red Mansion Art Prize Exhibition," featuring works by Zo Brown, Masie Kendall, Jennie Coles, Bruno Pacheco, Neil Stewart and Belen Uriel -- all winners of the 2004 Red Mansion Art Prize -- goes on view at the Royal College of Art in London, Oct. 29-Nov. 7, 2004. Established in 2002 to promote artistic exchange between China and the UK, the Red Mansion Prize is open to post-graduate students at Londons six top art colleges; winners travel to China, where they are given studio space to live and work alongside Chinese artists. The 2004 jury included ICA director Philip Dodd, Art Review editor Rebecca Wilson, artist Paul Winstanley, art critic Edward Lucie-Smith, Artnet UK director Joe La Placa and Red Mansion Foundation director Nicolette Kwok. For more info, contact aw@redmansion.co.uk

ED RUSCHA TO VENICE
The U.S. State Department has selected California Pop artist Ed Ruscha to represent the U.S. at the 2005 Venice Biennale. The 66-year-old artist, who currently has a drawing retrospective touring the U.S. (it opened at the Whitney Museum, is currently at the L.A. MOCA and is slated to appear at the National Gallery), was chosen not by a panel formed by the National Endowment for the Arts but rather by an informal group of museum directors and curators (including representatives of the Guggenheim Museum, which owns the U.S. Pavilion in the Giardini in Venice). Curator of the exhibition, selected by the artist himself, is Fogg Art Museum associate curator of contemporary art Linda Norden. Now, fund-raising for the show, which is informally budgeted at $1 million, must begin; in hand so far is $170,000 from the state department.

NEW BIENNALE IN MOSCOW
The 1st Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art opens at the former Lenin Museum in Moscow, Jan. 28-Feb. 28, 2005. Overseen by the Russian Ministry of Culture, the show has the theme of "Dialectics of Hope," articulated as both a personal feeling and a utopian vision. Organizers of the main exhibition are Joseph Backstein (deputy director of the State Centre for Museums and Exhibitions ROSIZO), Daniel Birnbaum (director of Kunsthalle Portikus and rector of the Stadelschule Art Academy, Frankfurt), Iara Boubnova (director of the Institute of Contemporary Art, Sofia), Nicolas Bourriaud (co-director of the Palais de Tokyo), Rosa Martinez (artistic director of the Arsenale at the 2005 Venice Biennale) and Hans Ulrich Obrist (curator of the Muse dArt Moderne de la Ville de Paris).

WYETH RETRO LAUNCHES IN ATLANTA
The High Museum of Art in Atlanta inaugurates its new, Renzo Piano-designed Wieland Pavilion in November 2005 with a retrospective of the dean of American realists, Andrew Wyeth.(b. 1917) "Andrew Wyeth: Memory and Magic" features approximately 100 works dating from the 1930s to the present. The show is co-organized with the Philadelphia Museum, where it appears in 2006.

SLIDE PROJECTOR ART IN BALTIMORE
Kodak has announced that it is ceasing to manufacture slide projectors, and now the Baltimore Museum of Art is making slide projectors the focus of a museum exhibition. "SlideShow," Feb. 27-May 15, 2005, is billed as the first major museum show of slide projector art. Featured are 19 installations by Robert Barry, James Coleman, Jan Dibbets, Fischli & Weiss, Nan Goldin, Dan Graham, Dennis Oppenheim and other artists. The show also includes "Project Yourself," a continuous slide show of images submitted by the public, and The Last Slide Projector, a 2004 documentary by Paige Sarlin. The exhibition, which is curated by Darsie Alexander, travels to the Contemporary Art Center in Cincinnati, July 2-Sept. 11, 2005, and the Brooklyn Museum, Oct. 7, 2005-Jan. 8, 2006.

BOGUS ARTIFACTS IN HIRST AUCTION?
Several of the Damien Hirst artifacts sold in the record-setting $20-million "Pharmacy" auction at Sothebys London last week [see "Art Market Watch," Oct. 21, 2004] may not be the real thing, according to a report in the London Independent newspaper. Auction catalogue small print revealed that several items -- all billed as "original" fixtures and fittings -- were in fact manufactured after Hirst closed his celebrity watering hole. "Theyre still made by Hirst!" proclaimed the auction house.

TATE BRITAIN BANS TURNER PRIZE FILM
Tate Britain
has yanked a film by Ben Langlands and Nikki Bell from its celebrated "Turner Prize 2004" exhibition, claming that it might influence jurors in the current trial in London of alleged warlord Faryadi Sarwar Zardad. The 12-minute film, Zardads Dog, includes footage of the trial of Afghan multiple murderer Abdullah Shah in the Kabul Supreme Court, made while Langlands and Bell were "official war artists" and displayed at Englands Imperial War Museum last year. Zardad was found guilty and executed in 2003. The artists say that they support the Tates decision.

MACBAIN BUYS FRENCH ART PUBLISHER
LTB Holding Ltd., the investment holding company of new art-publishing magnate Louise T. Blouin MacBain, has acquired Somogy, a French-language publisher of art books and exhibition catalogues. LTB now owns Art + Auction, Gallery Guides, Museums Magazines, Modern Painters -- and is rumored to be looking at the London-based Art Research Index, an art-price database.

MOCA LAUNCHES "GRAND AVENUE" BRANCH
The Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has renamed its downtown building. The former MOCA California Plaza, the Postmodernist 1986 sandstone building designed by Arata Isozaki, is henceforth to be known as MOCA Grand Avenue. The move is designed to more closely brand the museum with L.A.s Grand Avenue "cultural corridor."

ST. ETIENNE CELEBRATES 65 YEARS
New Yorks beloved gallery of expressionist art, the Galerie St. Etienne, celebrates its 65th anniversary with a survey of "Austrian and German Expressionism," Oct. 28, 2004-Jan. 8, 2005. Many of the artists in the show -- Lovis Corinth, Richard Gerstl, Erich Heckel, Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka, Kthe Kollwitz, Alfred Kubin, Paula Modersohn-Becker, Egon Schiele -- were introduced in the U.S. by gallery founder Otto Kallir, who was forced to leave his native Austria by the 1938 Nazi Anschluss.

BOMB SCARE IN SOHO
New York remains on alert. On Oct. 27, police closed off the streets around the SoHo intersection of Broome and Greene Streets after receiving reports that an "Arabic-looking man" had stepped out of a Mercedes and placed a land mine in a trash can on the corner. According to observers, the police bomb squad first sent an officer in protective clothes to X-ray the object and then used a robot to remove it.

MOMA GETS CISNEROS WORKS
The Museum of Modern Art has acquired nine works of modern Latin American painting and sculpture as a gift from the collection of museum trustee Patricia Phelps de Cisneros. The donation includes works by Lygia Clark, Gego, Gyula Kosice, Hlio Oiticica, Armando Revern, Jess Soto and Joaqun Torres-García.

GRIBBON QUITS AT GETTY MUSEUM
J. Paul Getty Museum
director Deborah Gribbon has quit after four years on the job, giving a mere two weeks notice. She cited differences "on a number of critical issues" with J. Paul Getty Trust director Barry Munitz. West Coast gossip paints the filthy-rich art center as a hotbed of political intrigue, plagued by low morale and staff turmoil, with a trustee board packed by Munitz with non-art specialists. According to a report in the New York Times, Gribbon was frustrated that her decisions had to be approved by Munitz, and lobbied to have him dismissed -- unsuccessfully. In a sharply worded piece, Los Angeles Times art critic Christopher Knight mocked the Getty for letting rare works by Rubens and Vermeer, recently offered at auction, slip through its fingers -- while it was announcing "cultural heritage" grants to 51 colleges and universities. A 20-year veteran of the museum who had been director for the past four years, Gribbon is reported to have been earning in excess of $450,000 a year.

STAINBACK OUT AT SITE SANTA FE
Charles Stainback is leaving his position as executive director of Site Santa Fe, barely a year after he took the job. "Not the right fit," said board president Marlene Nathan Meyerson. Stainback had no comment. He was formerly the director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College.

LACMA CURATOR HEADS NEW FOUNDATION
Tim B. Wride
, curator of photography at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, has left the museum to become executive director of the new No-Strings Foundation, which has been established in Los Angeles to award grants to individual photographers. The first two awards of $25,000 are expected to be announced next fall. For more info, contact nostringsfndn@aol.com.

TERRY DINTENFASS, 1920-2004
Terry Dintenfass, 84, New York art dealer who opened her first gallery in 1959 and finally retired in 1999, died at her home in Manhattan on Oct. 26. She represented Ben Shahn and other political artists, the early modernists Arthur Dove and Charles Sheeler, and many black artists, including Richard Hunt, Jacob Lawrence, Horace Pippin and Raymond Saunders.

ARTNET, SOTHEBYS IN NEW COLLABORATION
Sothebys and Artnet have teamed up to bring a new level of transparency to the art market. In the innovative pilot project, Sothebys.com is linking lots in its online auction catalogues to a selection of past auction results for comparable lots drawn from Artnets signature price database. Sothebys and Artnet are offering the info for several forthcoming Sothebys auctions in New York: Impressionist and modern art (Nov. 4-5, 2004), contemporary art (Nov. 9-10), Latin American art (Nov. 16-17) and American paintings, drawings and sculpture (Dec. 1).


Contact wrobinson @ artnet.com



 
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