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Artnet News
8/30/01


TATE TEAMS WITH BT ON WEB
Six months after the Tate in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York abandoned their planned e-commerce collaboration, the Tate has announced the first corporate sponsor of its website -- BT, otherwise known as British Telecommunications. As if to point out the populist nature of the enterprise, the Tate enlisted supermodel Jerry Hall for the press launch in London yesterday. The Tate will only say that BT has provided "considerably more" than £100,000 to develop the Tate site, which is already a web standout, with over 14,000 images from Tate holdings posted online. As for the new partnership, first up is an artist's web project by Damien Hirst, who will develop a game based on his "Pharmacy" scheme in conjunction with a show "Still Life/Object/Real Life" slated for the museum in October. Also planned is a VR tour of some 40 Tate galleries, due in November, under the supervision of new tech chief Jemima Rellie.

BAGHDAD WANTS ART LOOT BACK
Iraq has issued a statement demanding the return of looted archeological relics from European museums, according to a report by Agence France-Presse. Iraqi archeology head Jaber Khalil Ibrahim told Al-Ilam weekly that the Louvre in Paris as well as museums in London and Berlin held stolen archeological treasures from Iraq. Baghdad says that sites were looted by U.S. soldiers during the 1991 Gulf war as well as by U.N. diplomats.

WARHOL IN EASTERN EUROPE
The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh has sent touring exhibitions to 86 venues since 1996, reaching more than 3,000,000 people (and earning $700,000 in fees). Beginning last year, the Warhol sent a show of the Pop master's work to 12 countries in eastern and southern Europe, in conjunction with the U.S. State Department. The retrospective, dubbed "Andy Warhol," has already appeared at the Slovak National Gallery, Bratislava; the State Museum of Art, Riga, Latvia; the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow; and the Yapi Kredi Kazim Taskent Art Gallery in Instanbul. Last up are the Art Pavilion Zagreb in Croatia, Sept. 11-Oct. 23, 2001, and the Moderna Gallerija in Ljubljana, Slovenia, Nov. 6-Dec. 9, 2001. The Warhol is also sending a show of Andy's prints around the U.S. that ends its tour at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art in Brunswick, Me., Sept. 29-Dec. 23, 2001.

MET ACQUIRES JACOB LAWRENCE PAINTING
The Metropolitan Museum has acquired The Photographer by Jacob Lawrence, a 1942 painting of Harlem street life done when the late artist was 25 -- the same year the museum acquired its first work by Lawrence, The Pool Player, a prize-winner in its wartime exhibition "Artists for Victory." The painting is currently on view along with works by Benny Andrews, Leonardo Drew, Anselm Kiefer, Graham Nickson, Faith Ringgold and Joel Shapiro in "Paintings on Paper: Recent Acquisitions," to Nov. 25, 2001.

COOPER-HEWITT STUDY CENTERS ON TAP
The Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum opens its new Drue Heinz Study Center for Drawings and Prints and the Henry Luce Study Room for American Art on Oct. 25, 2001. Both study centers, following a two-year, $1.5-million renovation underwritten by the two namesake foundations, were designed by Polshek Partnership Architects, and house a collection of 160,000 works. An open house for the print center is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 1, from 2 to 5 p.m. in conjunction with the first city-wide "print week" sponsored by the International Fine Print Dealers Association. For more info or to schedule an appointment email d&p@ch.si.edu.

JUAN MUNOZ, 1953-2001
Juan Munoz, 48, Spanish sculptor known for mute gray figures placed in anonymous architectural spaces, died of a heart attack while on vacation in Ibiza on Aug. 28. Born in Madrid, Munoz studied in London and worked with the artists Richard Serra and Mario Merz before having his first solo exhibition in 1984. In June he opened a major installation in Tate Modern's vast Turbine Hall; a mid-career retrospective opens at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C., in October and travels to the Los Angeles MOCA, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Houston CAM. In New York he exhibited with Marian Goodman Gallery. Munoz is survived by his wife, the Spanish artist Christina Iglesias, and their two young children.