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Artnet News
5/24/02


"BLINK" DUBS TOP 100 PHOTOGRAPHERS
Phaidon, the hip book publisher that has brought us the Andy Warhol catalogue raisonné as well as two successive "exhibitions in a book" otherwise known as Cream and Fresh Cream, is at it again -- with Blink, a survey of 100 top contemporary photographers selected by a group of 10 critics, curators and art directors. The 448-page hardcover, which carries a list price of $69.95, also contains several texts on photographs.

The photographers: Abir Abdullah, Gosbert Adler, Akinbodé Akinbiyi, Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott, Alexander Apóstol, Marc Asnin, Alejandro Bachrach, Tina Barney, Yto Barrada, Uta Barth, Pat Brassington, Adriana Calatayud, Daniel Canogar, Albert Chong, Omar D, Tracey Derrick, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Rineke Dijkstra, Rose Farrell & George Parkin, Samuel Fosso, Seiichi Furuya, Jenny Gage & Tom Betterton, Pablo Garber, Tierney Gearon, Maya Goded, Julio Grinblatt, Jitka Hanzlová, Naoya Hatakeyama, Fran Herbello, Gavin Hipkins, Takashi Homma, Dieter Huber, Sameera Huque, Tomoko Isoda, Sanja Ivekovíc, Wu Jialin, Gerald van der Kaap, Osamu Kanemura, Jean-Pierre Khazem, KIDing®, Atta Kim, Steven Klein, Boo Moon Kwon, Rosemary Laing, Luisa Lambri, Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin, Jungjin Lee, Eva Leitolf, Laura Letinsky, Marcos López, Paula Luttringer, Rut Blees Luxemburg, Chema Madoz, Bertien van Manen,Taiji Matsue, Annu Palakunnathu Matthew, Craig McDean, Hellen van Meene, Boris Mikhailov, Santu Mofokeng, Santos Montes, Abelardo Morell, Mala Mukerjee, Vik Muniz, Yurie Nagashima, Lamia Naji, Eustáquio Neves, Otobong Nkanga, Katsumi Omori, Yuki Onodera, Tatiana Parcero, Swapan Parekh, Eileen Perrier, Patricia Piccinini, Plonk & Replonk, RES, Xavier Ribas, Hans-Christian Schink, Joachim Schmid, Zineb Sedira, Shirana Shahbazi, Paul M Smith, Manit Sriwanichpoom, Hannah Starkey, Beat Streuli, Gerardo Suter, Michel Szulc-Krzyzanowski, Michael Thompson, Diana Thorneycroft, Milagros de la Torre, Iké Udé, Juan Urrios, Gabriel Valansi, Cássio Vasconcellos, Massimo Vitali, Hywell Waters, Carrie Mae Weems, Manfred Willmann, Ma Xiao Hu, Takashi Yasumura.

The curators: Shahidul Alam, photographer and director of Drik agency, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Marcelo Brodsky, photographer and president of Latin Stock in Buenos Aires; Joan Fontcuberta, photographer and the editor of Photovision, Utrera, Spain; Alasdair Foster, director of the Australian Centre for Photography, Sydney; Dennis Freedman, creative director of W and Details magazines, Christine Frisinghelli, editor of Camera Austria; Shino Kuraishi, curator of photography at the Yokohama Museum of Art; Simon Njami, editor of Revue Noire and artistic director of the Rencontres de la Photographie Africaine, Bamako, Mali; Wendy Watriss, photographer and artistic director of FotoFest, Houston; Paul Wombell, director of the Photographers' Gallery, London.

PATTI SMITH, ARTIST, AT WARHOL MUSEUM
The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh is mounting a retrospective of the artworks of Punk rock goddess Patti Smith. "Strange Messenger: The Art of Patti Smith" goes on view Sept. 28, 2002-Jan. 5, 2003, opening with a special evening of music and poetry by the artist at the Byham Theater in downtown Pittsburgh. The exhibition features more than 50 works on paper produced by Smith over the last 30 years, including a series of large-scale drawings inspired by the events of Sept. 11. The show also includes manuscripts, photographs and a collaborative film she made with photographer Robert Mapplethorpe.

GLOBAL APPROACH IN "QUEENS INTERNATIONAL"
Queens, that New York borough on the other side of the East River from uptown Manhattan, now has its own international exhibition -- the borough is, after all, the most culturally diverse county in the nation, with over 50 percent of the households headed by first-generation immigrants. The "Queens International" opens at the Queens Museum of Art, Aug. 11-Nov. 3, 2002, with works by approximately 20 artists who live or work in Queens but nevertheless maintain a strong connection to their native country. Participants in the exhibition are to be selected in June through an open-call jury process. For more information, see www.queensmuse.org.

SEATTLE MUSEUM UNVEILS SCULPTURE PARK PLAN
The Seattle Art Museum has unveiled the design by Weiss/Manfredi Architects for the museum's new Olympic Sculpture Park, an 8.5-acre former industrial site overlooking the city's Puget Sound waterfront. The "topographically animated" Z-shaped park, joining three sites otherwise separated by train tracks and roads, is to hold works from SAM's collection (like Alexander Calder's 1971 sculpture Eagle) as well as special commissions and installations. The park is to contain a 7,000-square-foot pavilion descend from the edge of the city down to the waterfront through what will be three archetypal Northwest landscapes -- a dense evergreen forest, a deciduous forest, and a shoreline garden. Construction of the $60-million project, for which $17 million is in hand, begins in 2003.

EXPANDING THE PHILLIPS
The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., has announced plans for an $18-million, 30,000-square-foot annex to the museum's current Dupont Circle facility. Designed by Cox Graae + Spack Architects, the new structure adds 11,833 square feet of gallery space and provides a 180-seat auditorium as well as a center for studies in modern art. Construction won't affect programs in the museum's original 1887 Georgian revival mansion -- which hosts "Pierre Bonnard: Early and Late," starting Sept. 22, 2002 -- but will cause the closure of the Goh Annex; some 55 works ordinarily on view there are to be sent on a five city tour as "Beyond Isms: Masterworks from El Greco to Picasso," bowing at the Houston MFA in September.

MACDOWELL MEDAL TO ROBERT FRANK
Photographer Robert Frank has won the MacDowell Medal for 2002, the annual award presented by the MacDowell Colony in Petersborough, N.H. The award is presented on Aug. 18 at the colony, the only day it is open to the general public (for info see www.macdowellcolony.org). Frank is the 43rd winner of the prize, which has gone in the past to Aaron Copland, I.M. Pei, Eudora Welty and Jasper Johns.

PRITZKER TO AUSTRALIAN
Australian architect Glenn Murcutt, a 66-year-old Sydney architect who works as a sole practitioner and is known for environmentally friendly, energy-conscious houses, receives the Pritzker Architecture Prize for 2002 in a ceremony on May 29 at Michelangelo's Campidoglio in Rome. Murcutt is the first Australian to win the prize, which has been awarded 26 times and carries a cash purse of $100,000.

GAVIN BROWN INVADES ROME
New York's charismatic avant-garde art dealer, Gavin Brown, is opening a new space in Rome this summer, as reported by Mark Kostabi in his recent Artnet column, Ask Mark Kostabi. Called "Roma Roma Roma," the new project is a collaboration between Brown, Toby Webster and Turin dealer Franco Noero, and is located at Via dell'Arco de' Tolomei, 2. For more info, try mail@romaromaroma.biz.

ROHMER STAR IN MET, FRICK
As film writer Geoffrey O'Brien notes in the May Artforum, the new movie by the 82-year-old French auteur Eric Rohmer, The Lady and the Duke, is a digitalized version of the 1801 memoirs of British aristocrat Grace Dalrymple Elliott, lover of the Duc d'Orleans. An additional footnote was passed on to Artnet News by collector Norman Dubrow -- both the Metropolitan Museum and the Frick Collection hold portraits of Elliott by English aristocratic portraitist supreme Thomas Gainsborough in their collections. At the Met is a full-length figure while the Frick holds a smaller portrait.

 
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