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ArtNet News
4/5/99
 
     
  BASEL ART FAIR 1999
Art 30 Basel, the international fair of modern and contemporary art, celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, June 16-21, 1999. Approximately 260 galleries are participating (of the 700 that applied), including 50 first-timers. Among the new galleries this year are Robert Miller, Barbara Gladstone, Tony Shafrazi, Casey Kaplan, David Zwirner and I-20 of New York, Lotta Hammer of London, Mehdi Chouakri of Berlin and Luisa Strina of Sao Paolo. Twenty-six galleries will participate in the "Art Statements" section, in which the work of one artist is featured. Pat Hearn is showing Monica Prieto, Neu of Berlin is showing John Bock, and Alexander and Bonin is showing Willie Cole. For more information check out the Art Basel website at http://www.art.ch.

ART 1999 CHICAGO
Art 1999 Chicago opens at Navy Pier in the Windy City, May 7-11, 1999, with over 200 dealers from 25 countries. The fair features a video installation by Camel, the cigarette brand. The vernissage benefits the Chicago Museum of Contemporary Art. General admission is $10.

ARTFORUM GOES WEST
Artforum magazine is moving westward to 357 Seventh Ave., between 29th and 30th Streets (near Macy's). Relocation from offices in the famous Louis Sullivan landmark Bayard-Condit Building on Bleecker St. is scheduled to take place this summer.

NOGUCHI MUSEUM REOPENS
The Isamu Noguchi Garden Museum in Long Island City opened for its 15th season on Thurs., Apr. 1, with new displays of the artist's early abstract drawings, made following his 1927 apprenticeship with Constantin Brancusi. Also newly on view will be Tent of Holofernes, a set designed for Martha Graham's 1951 production Judith.

ICP AWARDS
The International Center of Photography has announced the recipients of its 1999 Infinity Awards. They are former Random House publisher Harold Evans, cited for lifetime achievement; Arnold Newman, master of photography; German Society of Photography founder and Cologne Photokina mastermind Fritz Gruber, for advancement of photography internationally; 26-year-old Copenhagen Politiken newspaper lenser Nicolai Fuglsig, for young photographer; Dutch magazine, design; Juarez: The Laboratory of Our Future, publication; John Morris, writing; Hiroshi Sugimoto, art; Kosovo documentarian Alexandra Boulat, for journalism; and modern architecture photographer Julius Shulman, for applied photography.

MALRAUX MUSEUM REOPENS
Closed for two years for renovations, the Museum of Fine Arts André Malraux in Le Havre, France, has just reopened with an exhibition of 60 works by Georges Braque (through June 21, 1999).

CONTEMPORARY ART TRAVEL COMPANION
Art lovers en route to France this summer will want to pick up a copy of Art Sites-France by curator and avid art traveler Sidra Stitch. The $19.95 paperback blurbs all the important museums, art centers, galleries and public art works, famous and little known. To order contact (415) 437-2456 or visit www.artsitespress.com.

HARING FOR KIDS
The Keith Haring Foundation has created a website for kids under 14 at www.haringkids.com featuring interactive games, online books and art shows.

NEW ACQUISITIONS FOR BALTIMORE
The Baltimore Museum of Art says it got 600 new acquisitions in 1998, including a 7th-century Chinese Mortuary Retinue made of 39 earthenware figures and a ca. 1815 card table made in Baltimore by Thomas Renshaw. New additions to the painting and sculpture collection include Rodin's bronze of Pope Benedict XV (1915), several works by Jacopo Bassano (1510-1592) and a Man Ray painting titled Abstraction (1924).

ANTIQUARIAN BOOK FAIR IN N.Y.
The 39th annual New York Antiquarian Book Fair takes place Apr. 15-18 at the Park Avenue Armory at 67th Street. Sponsored by Sanford L. Smith & Associates and the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America, the fair includes 182 exhibitors from 11 countries. Appraisals are offered on Apr. 18 from noon till 3 p.m.

FREUD IN NEW YORK
The controversial Freud show from the Library of Congress comes to New York this month when "Sigmund Freud: Conflict and Culture" opens at the Jewish Museum on Apr. 18, 1999. Along with a huge trove of archival photographs, prints, manuscripts, letters and other documents from Congress' Freud Archives are comic books that trace the influence of psychoanalysis on popular culture, a model of Freud's couch and the death mask of the Wolf Man. Organized by Michael S. Roth of the Getty Research Institute, the exhibition also travels to Vienna, Los Angeles, Sao Paulo and Chicago. A companion volume with essays by Harold Blum, Art Spiegelman and others has been published by Knopf.

NEW OUTREACH CENTER AT VIRGINIA MFA
The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond has just opened the Center for Education and Outreach in a building that once served as the Home for Needy Confederate Women. The center, known as the CEO, has classes, a multimedia lab and high-tech conference rooms, and will house the museum's new Office of Statewide Partnerships.

GIFT TO THE RENWICK
Washington playwright and quilt historian Patricia Smith Melton has donated a collection of rare American quilts to the Renwick Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution. The gift includes 34 works dating from 1775 to 1850, combining large-figured glazed chintzes with miniature patterned polychrome calicoes. The collection was featured in a 1997 Renwick exhibition "Calico and Chintz."

GRIGGS IN ANCHORAGE
Colorado artist David Griggs recently completed a terrazzo floor installation for West High School in Anchorage, Alaska. The project consists of a colorful tesselating pattern of triangles inlaid with bronze atomic symbols and numbers. Titled Glacial Alchemy, the installation is meant to explore the relationship between the natural forces of glaciers and the human capacity for knowledge.

JUDD ESTATE SELLING IN NEW YORK?
Word on the SoHo streets has it that the Donald Judd estate, headquartered down in Marfa, Tx., is selling the Judd loft building at the corner of Spring and Mercer Streets that until now contained permanent installations by Dan Flavin and David Novros. Apparently the estate, headed by the late Minimalist's wife, Marianne Stockebrand, first sought interest from art institutions before putting it on the market for a cool $5 million.