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Artnet News
3/21/02


LINEUP FOR DUBROW BIENNIAL
Collector Norman Dubrow has announced his choices for the "Dubrow Biennial 2002," opening at Kagan Martos Gallery at 515 Broadway in SoHo, Mar. 26-May 4, 2002. The retired New York City civil engineer says his selection is designed "to showcase 35 of the best painters and photographers working today," though Dubrow omits artists who he would place in this category, but who were in previous biennials, like Kurt Kauper, Ellen Gallagher, Christian Schumann and Catherine Opie. Though the artists are from Dubrow's collection, most of the works in his show are on loan from galleries, and are for sale. The artists are Michael Bevilacqua, Jesse Bransford, Katherine Bernhardt, Christopher Chiappa, Jay Davis, Tim Davis, Benjamin Edwards, Arturo Elizondo, Inka Essenhigh, Roe Ethridge, Gajin Fujita, Torben Giehler, Anthony Goicolea, James Gobel, Katy Grannan, Robert Heckes, John Hodany, Justine Kurland, Michael Lazarus, Malerie Marder, Tony Matelli, Barry McGee, John Newsom, Nicky Nodjoumi, Manuel Ocampo, Laura Owens, Erik Parker, Scott Peterman, Jon Pylypchuk, Les Rogers, Aaron Romine, Miss Sissel Kardel, Lane Twitchell, Su-en Wong, Amy Yoes. For info, contact info@kaganmartos.com.

MENIL SHOWS FASTOW ART
It seems that disgraced Enron chief financial officer Andrew Fastow's art collection is still suitable for hanging in the hallowed halls of Houston's Menil Collection. According to a report in the Dallas Morning News, works by Ed Ruscha and Agnes Martin owned by Fastow and his wife Lea (who headed Enron's art committee) are still on display at the celebrated museum, which also has room to store Enron's prize latticework sculpture by Martin Puryear. The Enron art collection includes about 20 works by Vik Muniz, Claes Oldenburg, Nam June Paik, Bridget Riley, Bill Viola and others, worth a total of $3 million. The art is likely to be sold as part of bankruptcy proceedings, and probably held its value better than Enron stock, which fell from $90 a share to near nothing today.

HESSE SURVEY TO TATE MODERN
The Eva Hesse retrospective organized by Elisabeth Sussman for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art is going to the Tate Modern next November. The Tate was able to pick up the show, which is also slated to appear at the Museum Wiesbaden in Germany, after budget constraints caused the Whitney Museum to cancel its plans to take the exhibition. Word is that SF MOMA is charging a steep $400,000 loan fee, more than the Whitney wanted to pay. The Tate is moving its Donald Judd show, which was scheduled for autumn 2002, to 2004.

CHRISTIE'S TO RAISE FEES?
Christie's auction house is likely to raise its buyer's commissions to match Sotheby's new rates, writes Carol Vogel in the New York Times. The old fees are 20 percent on sales up to $15,000, 15 percent on sales of $15,000-$100,000 and 10 percent on anything above $100,000. The new, two-tiered structure, adopted by Sotheby's last week, is 19.5 percent on sales up to $100,000 and 10 percent on the rest. Christie's move to increase revenues includes new staff reductions of 18 people in New York; since 2001, the company has cut its staff by 15 percent to about 1,900 employees.

TATE MODERN NO PLACE FOR ART: SCHJELDAHL
In his New Yorker magazine review of Donna De Salvo's installation of the traveling Andy Warhol retrospective at the Tate Modern in London, critic Peter Schjeldahl grants that the U.S.-born curator has made "pleasure the keynote" (opening with Warhol's "Flower" series), but calls the Herzog & de Meuron-renovated Tate Modern power plant "a scandalously lousy place for looking at art." Schjeldahl goes on: "The viewer's sensitivity is punished by ceilings that are too high, bunker-thick walls, dingy floors of concrete and unfinished wood, and uniform, rainy-weekend lighting." The litany continues: "The museum's much deplored curatorial policy" -- thematic groupings with extensive wall labels -- results in "grisly autopsies of modern art." It's a "pity for art and for England," he says.

TOPLESS IN CHELSEA
Where contemporary art galleries go, can the rest of civilization be far behind? Soon to move to Manhattan's Chelsea art district is Scores, New York's high-end topless bar. According to a report in the New York Observer, the notorious "gentlemen's club" has signed a 20-year lease on a 30,000-square-foot former garage at 533-535 West 28th Street in anticipation of being chased out of its current home on East 60th Street by former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani's zoning regulations. Chelsea already has a topless bar called Privilege at 23rd Street and 11th Avenue.

TRIPPY AT DARTMOUTH
The Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H., presents the largest survey of psychedelic rock posters in 25 years with "High Society: Psychedelic Rock Posters of Haight-Ashbury," Mar. 26-May 19, 2002. The exhibition, drawn from the collection of Paul Prince, features examples by the top artists of the trippy '60s -- Wes Wilson, Rick Griffin, Victor Moscoso, Stanley Mouse and Alton Kelley. The exhibition was organized by the San Diego Museum of Art, where it appeared last year.

ELIZABETH CATLETT AT JUNE KELLY
An exhibition of recent sculpture by pioneering African American sculptor Elizabeth Catlett opens at June Kelly Gallery in SoHo, Apr. 5-May 4, 2002, with sculptures done in wood, marble and bronze, many treating her trademark female imagery. Catlett, who was born in 1919, first came to wide public attention in 1940 when she won first prize at the American Negro Exposition in Chicago. Catlett's 15-foot-tall bronze sculpture of novelist Ralph Ellison is to be installed near his home at Riverside Drive and 150th Street later this year.

KLABIN IN TRIBECA
Famed Brazilian designer Mauricio Klabin, who died in 2000 at age 48, is the subject of a retrospective at the Latincollector Art Center in Tribeca. The show features Klabin's homemade hang-glider as well as his iconic Eclipse lamp (1982), a group of Akalanto chairs and aluminum vases, bowls and plates. The show also marks the U.S. debut of Klabin products (with the exception of the Eclipse, which has been sold at MoMA's design store since 1999).

ARTS MEDALS
President George W. Bush has awarded painter Helen Frankenthaler with a National Medal of Arts for 2001. Other winners are Johnny Cash, Kirk Douglas, Judith Jamison, Yo-Yo Ma and Mike Nichols. The awards are to be presented at a ceremony next month.

NEW HEAD FOR FREER
Julian Raby has been appointed director of the Freer Gallery and the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution, succeeding Milo Beach, who retired late last year. Raby, 52, is professor in Islamic art and architecture at Oxford University.



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