Search the whole artnet database

  Magazine Home  |  News  |  Features  |  Reviews  |  Books  |  People  |  Horoscope  
     
Artnet News
3/12/02


NAIL TALES AT BRONX MUSEUM
Hot new exhibition at the Bronx Museum of the Arts is "Manicurated," an installation by New York artist Judi Werthein, Mar. 15-May 26, 2002. The show, part of "Conversations with the Permanent Collection," a series that invites an artist to relate to the museum holdings, features an actual working nail salon staffed by professional manicurists, who will treat visitors to free manicures -- and "nail art" designs based on 10 works from the museum collection. Among the artists whose works are enlisted in this unusual enterprise are Ester Hernández, Byron Kim, José Meléndez Contreras, Liliana Porter, Tim Rollins & K.O.S., Coreen Simpson, Tseng Kwong Chi, Lynne Tamamoto, Larry Yañez and Zhang Hongtu. Manicures are given on Wednesdays and Saturdays; for appointments, call (718) 681-6000, ex. 128.

BUGGING OUT AT WAVE HILL
The Glyndor Gallery at Wave Hill, the splendid Bronx sculpture park, inaugurates spring with "Insecta Magnifica," Mar. 23-June 2, 2002, an exhibition of works by 14 contemporary artists who are fascinated with our creepy-crawly friends. Organized by Jennifer McGregor, the show features National Geographic contributor Joseph Scheer's large watercolor prints made from direct digital scans of moths, a centipede made from discarded umbrella ribs and vegetable steamers by Hyungsub Shin, a sculpture including orb weaving spiders by Lars Chellberg, and works by Barbara Broughel, Sue Johnson, J. Morgan Puett, Cynthia Carlson, Kirsten Cole, Jacquelyn McBain, Christy Rupp, Vija Celmins, Susan Rowe Harrison, Lori Nix and Mary Ting.

LEONARDO AND POLAND
The Milwaukee Art Museum unveils "Leonardo da Vinci and the Splendor of Poland: A History of Collecting and Patronage," Sept. 13-Nov. 24, 2002, the first survey of Poland's private and public art collections to be presented outside Europe. Due to the Nazi occupation of Poland during World War II and the Cold War with the Soviet Union, "Poland has been effectively dismissed and ignored by American museums and scholarship," says exhibition curator Laurie Winters. Centerpiece of the exhibition of 77 works is Leonardo's Lady with an Ermine (ca. 1491). The show is also slated to appear at the Houston MFA and the Legion of Honor in San Francisco.

BARNEY ROSSET IN CHINA
Last chance this week to head to Janos Gat Gallery at 1100 Madison Avenue in New York to see the World War II photographs taken in China by Grove Press champion Barney Rosset (then husband to painter Joan Mitchell), Feb. 12-Mar. 23, 2002. The black-and-white photos were taken by Rosset in the summer of 1945 while he was photo officer with the 164th Signal Photo Corp. in China, and document confrontations between Chinese units and the retreating Japanese army. (After the war, Rosset went on to become a champion of censored literature with U.S. publications of D.H. Lawrence's Lady Chatterley's Lover (1959) and Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer (1961), as well as many other titles.) Gat has published a catalogue, "China in Conflict: War Photographs 1944-1945," reproducing some of Rosset's photos and including a brief memoir by him; for more info, contact the gallery at (212) 327-0441.

ART & DESIGN IN FORT GREENE
Add a new stop to your New York gallery tour -- the A: D/B Project Space in Fort Greene, Brooklyn, a mixed-income neighborhood located between Brooklyn Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant. The new gallery, opened its doors on Feb. 20, 2002, with a brief that encompasses art, architecture and design. First show is "Loveseats for Virginia Woolf," an exhibition by architect and designer Annie Coggan of four pieces of enamel-finished steel furniture, models and drawings conceived as "a form of functional, visual biography." Opening Mar. 20-Apr. 27 is a video installation by Jose Carlos Casado, with a show exploring the architectural history of Fort Greene slated for May. Directors of the space are architect Thomas MacGregor (who has worked with Leo Castelli and Richard Artschwager) and Catherine Morris (a curator and critic who once wrote for Artnet Magazine).

$2.4 MILLION CUT FOR 2003 VENICE BIENNALE
Venice Biennale president Franco Bernabe, the former director of Telecom Italia who was appointed to the powerful cultural post last December, faces a cut of $2.4 million in the $14.2 million allocated to the festival by the Italian government in 2001. It's unclear whether and how Bernabe plans to make up the shortfall, but one thing is certain: Time magazine critic Robert Hughes is not the general curator of the 2003 Biennale. "It's up to the board of trustees to decide how the visual arts section is going to be organized," Bernabe told Wall Street Journal reporter Frederika Randall. "And the board has not yet been seated."

MARY BOONE GOES ONLINE
1980s superdealer Mary Boone, who currently operates two galleries in New York, has now opened her own website at www.maryboonegallery.com. The nicely done site -- by our friends over at Narrative Rooms -- features a homepage with portraits of her artists, ranging from Ross Bleckner, Eric Fischl and Barbara Kruger to Greg Bogin, Leonardo Drew and Damien Loeb (notably absent is Tom Sachs, who bragged in this week's New York Times Sunday Magazine about his 2000 show, which contained live ammunition, getting Mary thrown in jail). The portraits are by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, who had a very successful retrospective at the gallery in 1999. The site also includes a listing of all Boone's exhibitions since 1978, back when she showed the likes of Gary Stephan, Julian Schnabel, Alan Uglow and Robin Winters.

CAA AWARDS FOR 2002
The College Art Association held its 90th annual convention last month in Philadelphia, where it announced its annual awards. The Frank Jewett Mather Award for Art Criticism went to Arlene Raven, author of Crossing Over: Feminism and Art of Social Concern (1988) and monographs on Nancy Grossman (1991) and June Wayne (1997). The Distinguished Artist Award for Lifetime Achievement went to Miriam Schapiro, the feminist Pattern & Decoration painter whose work on paper was seen in a 1999 touring retrospective. Roger Shimomura, whose paintings are currently on view in a traveling exhibition at the Bellevue (Wash.) Art Museum, was honored with the Award for Distinguished Body of Work, Exhibition, Presentation or Performance. Cooper Union prof Hans Haacke won the Distinguished Teaching of Art Award, and Bryn Mawr College prof Dale Kinney received the Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award. The Arthur Kingsley Porter Prize for a Distinguished Article in the Art Bulletin went to Jonathan M. Reynolds for Ise Shrine and a Modernist Construction of Japanese Tradition. The Art Journal Award went to Joanna Roche for Performing Memory in Moon in a Tree: Carolee Schneemann Recollects Joseph Cornell. Art Institute of Chicago curator Stephen Little received the Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Award for Museum Scholarship for Taoism and the Arts of China, and U. Cal. Riverside prof Dale Kent received the Charles Rufus Morey Award for a Distinguished Book in the History of Art for Cosimo de' Medici and the Florentine Renaissance: The Patron's Oeuvre (Yale).

SKOWHEGAN MEDALS 2002
The Skowhegan art colony in central Maine has announced its 2002 awards. Jeff Koons wins the Medal for Sculpture. Lari Pittman receives the Medal for Painting, and Yoko Ono gets the Medal for Assorted Mediums. Art historian and author Irving Sandler is honored with the Governors Award for Outstanding Service in the Arts, while philanthropist Barney Ebsworth receives the Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney Award for Outstanding Patronage of the Arts. The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, displaced from its offices in 7 World Trade Center by the events of 9/11, receives a Special Citation from Skowhegan's Board of Governors. The awards are to be presented on Apr. 23 at a fundraising dinner at the Plaza Hotel in New York.

TIFFANY GRANTS FOR 2002
The Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation announced $20,000 grants for 35 artists last month, honoring artists "whose work shows serious promise but who have not yet received widespread critical or commercial recognition." Recipients are John Bankston, Suzanne Bocanegra, Nina Bovasso, Marco Brambilla, Christopher Broughton, Francis Cape, Nick Cave, Robert Chambers, Michael A. Cummings, Lisa Corinne Davis, Tara Donovan, Jenny Dubnau, Keith Edmier, Rico Gatson, Diana Guerrero-Maciá, Evan Holloway, Sedrick E. Huckaby, Margie Hughto, Steven Hull, Sergei Isupov, Brad Kahlhamer, Nina Katchadourian, Karen LaMonte, Nikki S. Lee, Julie Mehretu, A. Laurie Palmer, Sheila Pepe, Mauro Restiffe, Margo Sawyer, Michelle Segre, Sondra Sherman, Jean Shin, Marc Trujillo, Judyth van Amringe, Tetsuya Yamada. The jury consisted of Bard College museum director Amada Cruz, American Craft Museum curator Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Yale art school dean David Pease, and American Craft Museum director emeritus Paul J. Smith, along with artists Judy Pfaff, Martin Puryear and Cindy Sherman.

DARGER SYMPOSIUM INCLUDES POETS, ARTISTS
Poets John Ashbery and David Shapiro are speaking in a two-day symposium on Outsider artist Henry Darger at the Museum of American Folk Art in New York, Mar. 22-23, 2002, which includes readings from Darger's epic, In the Realms of the Unreal. The event, dubbed "Delving into Darger," includes an examination by Darger expert John M. MacGregor of the question of whether the reclusive Chicago janitor did in fact kill Elsie Paroubek, as has been suspected for years, as well as a panel discussion featuring artists from various disciplines. Tickets for the symposium are $60. For more info, contact the museum at (212) 977-7170.

ART BOON FOR CRANBROOK
The Cranbrook Museum of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., has received a donation of 46 contemporary artworks from Detroit resident Rose M. Shuey and her late husband, Dr. John Shuey. The Shuey gift, which includes works by de Kooning, Judd, Motherwell, Rauschenberg, Warhol and other important post-war artists, is currently on view in "Three Decades of Contemporary Art," Dec. 8, 2001-Apr. 7, 2002.

MUSEUM APPOINTMENTS
The Metropolitan Museum has named Joan Aruz as curator in charge of the department of ancient near Eastern art. Aruz has worked at the museum since 1978, and succeeds Prudence O. Harper, who retired in 1999... Raina Lampkins-Fielder has been appointed associate director for education at the Whitney Museum, in charge of the Independent Study Program, which is launching an architecture and urban studies program in conjunction with the school of architecture at Cooper Union... Gail Feigenbaum has been named associate director of programs at the Getty Research Institute, in charge of exhibitions and publications there; formerly she was curator of painting at the New Orleans Museum of Art.



More works by
Liliana Porter
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Tim Rollins + K.O.S.
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Zhang Hongtu
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Barbara Broughel
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Vija Celmins
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Joan Mitchell
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Ross Bleckner
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Eric Fischl
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Greg Bogin
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Tom Sachs
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Euan Uglow
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Roger Shimomura
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Jeff Koons
in Artnet Galleries

More works by
Lari Pittman
in Artnet Galleries
 
artnet—The Art World Online. ©2014 Artnet Worldwide Corporation. All rights reserved. artnet® is a registered trademark of Artnet Worldwide Corporation, New York, NY, USA.