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ARTNET NEWS
3/10/99
 
     
  TALK MAGAZINE: ART CRITIC WANTED
Tina Brown's already famous new Talk magazine, to be published by Hearst and Miramax in tandem, has announced its roster of staff writers. A few big names -- Constance White, fashion writer from the New York Times -- but what about an art critic? "I don't think so," said a Talk spokesperson, "but you should fax over your resume." The fax number is 830-5863.

DIA UP THE HUDSON
New York governor George E. Pataki and Dia Center for the Arts director Michael Govan have teamed up to open a $20-million new branch in a 292,000-square-foot former paperboard factory overlooking the Hudson River in Beacon, N.Y. Pataki has pledged $2 million to the project; Dia trustees have ponied up $8 million. The building and surrounding 26-acre-plot was donated by the International Paper Company in Purchase, N.Y.

The Beacon facility will showcase Dia's permanent collection of works by Beuys, Flavin, Serra, Warhol and others. A sculpture garden, book shop and restaurant are also in the plan. Govan was lieutenant to Guggenheim Museum director Tom Krens when Krens dreamed up Mass MOCA in North Adams, Mass. -- the factory-turned-museum project. Govan describes the 1929 Beacon factory as "a model of functional and elegant early 20th-century industrial architecture.

CASTELLI LEAVES SOHO
Dealer Leo Castelli, now 91, is shutting down his gallery at 600 West Broadway, the loft building that put Soho on the map as a gallery district. Castelli opens a mostly private space at 59 East 79th Street on Apr. 17 with an exhibition of Jasper Johns monotypes. The fate of 600 remains unresolved. For the time being, exhibitions continue at Charles Cowles and Ileana Sonnabend (who expects to move to Chelsea next fall).

OLYMPIA REPORTS RESULTS
The Olympia Fine Art & Antiques Fair in London has reported strong results for the triennial event, Feb. 23-28. Prize sales included a Gothic breakfront bookcase at Anthony Fell for £80,000 and a Miles Birket Foster painting at Chris Beetles Ltd. for £47,500. Attendance was up by 37 percent from last year, with a total of 24,874 visitors. The Summer Olympia Fair runs June 3-June 13, 1999.

NAZI LOOT AT NATIONAL GALLERY?
The National Gallery in London says the provenance of approximately 120 works in its collection may be tainted by Nazi looting during World War II. Eugène Delacroix's Christ on the Cross, two landscapes by Monet and works by Picasso, Pissarro and Rubens are among works possibly in Jewish collections prior to World War II. It is unclear whether the rightful owners, if discovered, will be given the works back or financially compensated.

FRANCE PROMOTES ITS OWN
The French government is spending over $1 million to promote French art on the West coast of the U.S. next fall. According to the New York Times, the French-American contemporary art fund Étant Donnés is rallying corporate sponsors to back museum exhibitions and subsidize curatorial jaunts to France. The program is called "Côte Ouest: A Season of French Contemporary Art."

HEADS ROLL AT MENIL COLLECTION
The Menil Foundation in Houston recently announced the departure of Menil Collection director Paul Winkler, chief financial officer Miles Glaser and board member Susan O'Connor. According to local press reports, Glaser was fired and Winkler and O'Connor then resigned. Glaser had worked for the Menil Foundation since 1970, and had been personal financial advisor to Dominque de Menil, who died about 15 months ago. Five de Menil heirs are on the foundation board, which unanimously voted to ask Winkler to reconsider his resignation. According to museum president Louisa Serofim, Winkler demanded the resignation from the board of Dominique's son François, which was unacceptable.

BERKELEY GETS N.Y. CURATOR
Former Jewish Museum curator Heidi Zuckerman Jacobsen has replaced Laurence Rinder as curator of the Matrix exhibitions of contemporary art at the Berkeley Art Museum. Rinder has gone to the California College of Arts and Crafts.

LICHTENSTEIN SCULPTURE IN THE CAPITAL
A 32-foot sculpture of brushstrokes by pop artist Roy Lichtenstein is going up outside the Corcoran Museum, just a block from the White House. The three-story-high Brushstroke Group is to stand at 17th Street and New York Avenue to inaugurate the Lichtenstein exhibition opening at the Corcoran on June 4, 1999, and will stay outside there for at least a year.

DISNEY'S MULAN AT SOTHEBY'S
Original cartoons from Disney's animated film Mulan soared above pre-sale estimates at Sotheby's New York on Mar. 6, bringing in a total of $507,000. An image of the villain Shan Yu with his falcon sold for $43,700 (est. $1,200). Another cell showing Mulan and Captain Shang went for $39,100 (est. 2,000).

ALLAN WARDELL, 1935-1999
Allen Wardell, 64, former director of the Asia Society Galleries in New York, died of a heart attack on Mar. 1 while on vacation in Colorado. Wardell headed the primitive art department of the Art Institute of Chicago from 1960 to 1973, and the Asia Society from 1974 to 1984.

COOKIES, ART AND TECHNOLOGY
Digital Desserts, a series of fundraisers for the Manhattan alternative arts space the Kitchen, kicks off with a round-table discussion between Tamas and Bogyi Banovich of Postmasters, Natalie Jeremijenko of the Bureau of Inverse Technology and Ricardo Domingues of the Thing and ECD. Chat over gourmet desserts with them on Friday, Mar. 12, at 512 W. 19th St.
 
 
 
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