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Artnet News
12/5/00
 
     
  RIO RISES AS TOP GUGG CONTENDER?
It seems still too early to call, but the London Guardian is fingering Rio de Janeiro as the choice to host a new branch of the Guggenheim Museum. Gugg director Thomas Krens is quoted as describing the chances of Brazil's capital to win the highly contested honor as "some place between a kind of done deal and a scouting expedition." The building site is likely to be in the city's Praca Maua district near the city docks. According to Brazilian press reports, the nod to Rio came after the city's mayor offered to fork out $100 million for the project. The winning city will officially be chosen in mid-2001 after a professional study.

ARTISTS CAMPAIGN AGAINST DROIT DE SUITE
Dozens of artists, including Anthony Caro, David Hockney and Emma Sargent, have joined the British Art Market Federation in a campaign against a scheme by the European Parliament to institute Europe-wide Droit de Suite rules next month, reports the London Telegraph. British opponents of the resale royalties system -- which would give a cut of up to five percent to the artists' estates every time their work is resold for up to 70 years after their death -- argue that the plan will just drive prices up, allowing both New York and Switzerland (not part of the EU) to undercut the European market. Droit de Suite was introduced in France in 1920 after Jean François Millet's widow was left penniless while his paintings fetched millions. France, Germany and nine other EU countries already have some form of the royalty.

TRACEY EMIN ANNOUNCES HER RETIREMENT
Bad girl yBa Tracey Emin is planning on dropping the art world for the literary world, reports the London Sunday Times. The artist told the newspaper she has had "more than enough kudos, notoriety and coverage," and claims she is changing her career to writing full time within the next four years. In the meanwhile, she plans to finish up an upcoming exhibition in April, after which she will devote six month entirely to her first novel, purchased last year by Sceptre press for £80,000.

BATMAN TROUNCES ARTIST IN COPYRIGHT CASE
A Los Angeles court has ruled against artist Andrew Leicester in his long-running copyright lawsuit against Warner Brothers for using a replica of his sculptural façade in the movie Batman Forever, according to Law.com. The Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Leicester's Zanja Madre (1992) -- four stylized towers and a gate in the form of a bat -- was not protected by copyright because it is architecturally indistinguishable from the Los Angeles building it decorates and buildings can't be copyrighted. Leicester's installation was originally made as a commentary on Southern California's dependence on water.

WEIGHTY CHANGES AT GOLDSMITHS
Conceptual painter Michael Craig-Martin is leaving his post as top prof of London's Goldsmiths College, to be replaced by conceptual photographer and theorist Victor Burgin. Art-world observers are marking the change due to Craig-Martin's influence on such students as superstars Damien Hirst, Gary Hume and Sarah Lucas. Goldsmiths' effect on British art of the 1990s has elicited comparisons to the California Institute of the Arts in the '70s, whose graduates -- including Eric Fischl, Mike Kelley and David Salle -- dominated '80s art in America.

NEW LANGTON ARTS TO ROOM WITH SF CAMERAWORK
In response to the displacement crisis currently plaguing the San Francisco arts community, media arts alternative gallery New Langton Arts is temporarily sharing its 1246 Folsom Street quarters with San Francisco Camerawork, beginning January 2001. Both nonprofits plan to remain independent, alternating exhibitions lasting approximately five weeks each.

DECEMBER BENEFITS
December is the time for giving, ergo, time to hold fundraising exhibitions of donated art works. SoHo nonprofit Artists Space has scheduled its venerable "Night of 1,000 Drawings," long a treasure trove of small works on paper available for $25, $40, and $50, Dec. 7-10; call (212) 226-3970 for details. East Village alternative space P.S. 122 is having its fifth annual small works raffle, featuring works by over 100 artists, Dec. 7-17. Tickets are $25 each or $100 for five; call (212) 228-4249 for more info. And Matthew Marks in Chelsea is exhibiting "Drawings and Photographs," works by over 250 artists to benefit the Foundation for Contemporary Performance Arts, Dec. 8-Dec. 23.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR PAT HEARN
The late Chelsea dealer Pat Hearn is being honored at a memorial service at St. Mark's Church in the Bowery on Dec. 14. The service, open to the public, starts at 2:30 p.m. Call (212) 337-0185 or (212) 727-7366 for more information.

DIGITAL S.W.A.T.
Artists Space and Pratt Institute team up for "Digital S.W.A.T.," a discussion of needs specific to artists working in new media, Dec. 6 at 6:30 p.m. The panel includes Time Out NY art editor Tim Griffin and Whitney Museum curator of new media art Christiane Paul and is moderated by artist and Artnet.com columnist Joy Garnett with digital culture magazine ArtByte's founder Bill Jones. The talk is being held at Artists Space at 38 Greene Street in SoHo.

2000 MITCHELL PRIZES
The 2000 Mitchell Prize of $10,000 for the best art history book of 1998-1999 has been awarded to David Anfam for Mark Rothko: The Works on Canvas (Yale University Press). The Eric Mitchell Prize of $10,000 for the best exhibition catalogue of 1999 has been bestowed to editor Frits Scholten for Adiaen de Vries 1556-1626 (Getty Trust Publications). The prize was founded in 1977 by businessman Jan Mitchell to draw attention to exceptional publications in English on art history.

GRANT FOR A REVOLUTIONARY OVER 35 YEARS OLD
Swedish artist Annika Ström is endowing a grant "for a revolutionary over 35 years old" as part of her exhibition at Goldman Tevis in Los Angeles, Dec. 9, 2000-Jan. 13, 2001. The endowment is a one-week residency that offers a bed and breakfast accommodation in Berlin's Mitte neighborhood, known for its "bourgeois, hip and bored people." Applicants are required to give a five-minute speech on the show's opening night stating why they think they deserve the prize. Be advised that the grant includes no money, and that the breakfast features coffee or tea, white bread, knaeckebrot, butter, cheese, jam, yogurt and müsli, a glass of fresh o.j. and fruit of the season. For more info contact Goldman Tevis at (213) 617-8217.

-- compiled by Giovanni Garcia-Fenech
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