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Artnet News
10/31/00
 
     
  BLACK PHOTOGRAPHERS IN BROOKLYN
The Brooklyn Museum of Art has plans for an encyclopedic exhibition of African American photographers next winter. "Committed to the Image," Feb. 2-Apr. 15, 2001, includes 94 photographers ranging from political lensers such as Salimah Ali, Kwame Brathwaite and Ozier Muhammad to seasoned shutterbugs such as Albert Chong, Gordon Parks and Carrie Mae Weems, as well as a host of younger artists including Stephen Marc, Fern Logan, Oggi Ogburn, Accra Shepp and Budd Williams. The selection was made by a committee including International Black Photographers founder Anthony Barboza, Black Photographers Annual co-founder Beauford Smith, Fotophile editor and photographer Orville Robertson and BMA curator of photography Barbara Head Millstein.

NADER BENEFIT IN MANHATTAN
New York artist Dan Asher and dealer Colin de Land are sponsoring a one-night benefit for the Ralph Nader campaign on Thursday, Nov. 2, 6-10 p.m., at the Pat Hearn Gallery on West 22nd Street in New York's Chelsea district. The event features a musical performance by the Graves and an art show with works by Michael Ashkin, Jacqueline Humphries, Jim Jarmusch, Tom Otterness, Seth Price, Tom Sachs, James Siena, Kiki Smith, Patti Smith and James Welling. Call (212) 727-7366 for more info.

WILLIAM BLAKE HELD IN ENGLAND
British Arts Minister Alan Howarth has temporarily blocked the export of William Blake's God Blessing the Seventh Day, one of 88 finished watercolors illustrating subjects from the Bible painted between 1800 and 1806 for Thomas Butts, his most important patron. The three-month deferral is designed to give British institutions a chance to raise the £650,000 required to purchase the work. Howarth also blocked the sale of two 15th-century reliquary figures of Saint Sebastian and Saint Christopher. No word on the prospective buyers.

ANTIQUES FAIR IN DALLAS
The newest entry in the international art-fair circuit is the Dallas International Art & Antique Fair, which is slated to debut at the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex, Nov. 2-Nov. 8, 2000. Among the ca. 70 exhibitors are Michael Goedhuis, Graham, Fred Leighton, MacConnal-Mason, M.S. Rau and Steinitz. The fair boasts plans to be the first fully accessible online live trade event, featuring streaming pictorial views of all the stands and live email and phone access to dealers. If the experiment is a success, you can expect it to travel to Florida -- the Dallas fair is organized by International Fine Arts Expositions, the company responsible for ArtPalmBeach, the Palm Beach International Art & Antique Fair and Palm Beach Town & Country. Visit ifae.com for more details.

UBS ART AWARD 2000
The U.S. finalists for the UBS Art Award 2000 -- which honors promising art students -- are André Barbossa and Joanna Mohammar from Hunter College and Hillary Bleecker from UCLA. Their works, along with the works of young artists from ten different countries, go on view at the Whitechapel Art Gallery in London, Dec. 7-Dec. 23, 2000. Winners of CHF 160,000 in cash prizes -- the top prize is CHF 30,000, and everyone wins at least CHF 2,000 -- are to be selected by a jury including North Miami's Museum of Contemporary Art director Bonnie Clearwater, Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles former president Douglas S. Cramer, Whitney Museum of American Art board trustee Beth Rudin DeWoody and Paine Webber CEO Donald B. Marron. The prize is organized by the Art Banking section of UBS Private Banking, the main sponsor for Basel's ART International Fair.

CHANGES AT WARHOL FOUNDATION
The Andy Warhol Foundation has announced plans to search for a successor for 10-year president and CEO Archibald L. Gillies, in time for Gillies' retirement June 30, 2001. In other news, collector Werner H. Kramarsky has been elected the foundation's chairman of the board of directors. He replaces Anthony Solomon, whose term has come to an end.

ICELAND IN NEW YORK
Iceland's pop music scene is becoming well-known thanks to singer-turned-actress Björk and newer and more recent contenders like Gus Gus and Sigur Ros, all profiled in today's New York Times arts section. But Reyjkavik is also home to a sparkling arts scene, the topic of the Apex Art Curatorial Program lecture by artist and curator Ingolfur Arnarsson, Nov. 1 at 7:00 p.m. Apex Art is located at 291 Church St. and admission is free; call (212) 431-5270 for more info.

-- compiled by Giovanni Garcia-Fenech
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